They Will Allow Recruits in Even if they Smoke Marijuana

Thanks to all of you who have been joining me here. We help bring change to lives. The response has been wonderful.  

We Made it to 5,000! Never dreamed we would do that. Thank you so much for the support. It also excites us that you are supporting veterans. That is our theme here right now. 

Help us make it to 6,000 by subscribing today if you haven’t already. As Of today we have 5590.  This shows you care for veterans. Just click on the icon right after the title of this post and click on FEEDBLITZ , and the posts will come straight to your inbox.                            ____________________________________________________________

Doug Bolton, the founder of the blog, Signs of Hope, which is at www.dailysignsofhope.com, has written a new book, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.” It reaches out the many military and veterans who may be battling anxiety, fear, depression, addictions, rejections, and the many other usual suspects. There are 22 military connected suicides every day. That is almost one every hour. Doug wants to help stop those statistics.  

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This is a new social network just for veterans. I joined it and made instant friendships with veterans who want to talk about what I want to talk about. Please check it out. You will be glad you did. 

https://www.rallypoint.com/join/spc-douglas-bolton

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They will Fight

If Russia moves against NATO  in the Baltic states or Poland, NATO will stand and fight, a key NATO commander said. This evokes thoughts of a cold war.

The “cold war” has become a problem in that there may be a major conflict causing increasing tensions.

They will stand united against any aggressor.

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The Deregulation President

The Federal Register, which contains all Federal rules, notices and regulations, topped 97,330 pages under President Obama. Under President Trump it has been shaved down to 45,678 pages.

The number of new rules for Trump was 65, way below the average of 213 rules from the last six presidents.

The cost for regulation soared from $68 billion under Bush, to $122 billion under Obama.

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The Army Relaxes Rules on Recruits and Marijuana

In an effort to boost its ranks and hot new targets for enlistees, the Army is relaxing its rules on granting waivers for marijuana use.

The catch is that the new recruits have to pledge to never use marijuana again. (Really?)

IN 2017 the Army granted 506 waivers-up from 191 in 2016.

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Could be a serious problems with a couple of the stories above. Allowing recruits to agree to not smoke marijuana again is pushing it. In the Vietnam days it was common for many of the soldiers to smoke.

Now they will be punished if they start again? Good luck with that.

The fact that NATO is willing to back us 100% is reassuring, but pray they never need to.

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Good evening fellow veterans. How are you doing? Have you had some struggles? Do you battle demons when you try to sleep? You are not alone. There are thousands just like you. We want you to be well, so if you are struggling seek help. If you are considering suicide, seek help.

There is a 24/7 helpline for just you. Call:

(877-247-4645)

Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never, ever, give up!!

General Patton Had a Love/Hate Relationship

Thanks to all of you who have been joining me here. We help bring change to lives. The response has been wonderful.  

We Made it to 5,000! Never dreamed we would do that. Thank you so much for the support. It also excites us that you are supporting veterans. That is our theme here right now. 

Help us make it to 6,000 by subscribing today if you haven’t already. As Of today we have 5,500.  This shows you care for veterans. Just click on the icon right after the title of this post and click on FEEDBLITZ , and the posts will come straight to your inbox.                            ____________________________________________________________

Doug Bolton, the founder of the blog, Signs of Hope, which is at www.dailysignsofhope.com, has written a new book, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.” It reaches out the many military and veterans who may be battling anxiety, fear, depression, addictions, rejections, and the many other usual suspects. There are 22 military connected suicides every day. That is almost one every hour. Doug wants to help stop those statistics.  

______________________________________________________________

This is a new social network just for veterans. I joined it and made instant friendships with veterans who want to talk about what I want to talk about. Please check it out. You will be glad you did. 

https://www.rallypoint.com/join/spc-douglas-bolton

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Military News for today.  Great stories.

This first story is very unusual in the it is about the famous General Patton’s grandson.

Ben Patton never was in the military like his grandfather General Patton, but he is doing whatever he can to support veterans through his documentaries that cover PTSD in veterans.

He was interviewed by Andrew Carroll about his contributions.

Your grandfather George Patton Jr. I one of the most famous generals in American history.  You father was a major general who served with Vietnam. That’s a unique way to grow up. 

My father used to say, “We’re not better or worse than anyone, we are just different.” We did have to act a certain way, behave appropriately, and have a service-oriented mind.

You didn’t join the military  was there pressure for you to do so? 

I think I felt pressure from history. I had a strong, but somewhat challenging relationship with my father. However, I always felt he wanted me to find my own path to lead an authentic life.

What inspired you to become a documentary filmmaker and teacher? 

I got interested in film. I wanted to find a way, beyond just going to veteran’s events and representing my family, to apply those talents and skills to the service of veterans and military families.

That led you to do the work of helping those veterans captured on film? 

Yes. Initially I was focused on combat veterans. They had too many things that the just couldn’t articulate in a normal conversation. We found that film could be a wonderful conduit for a veteran to express something.

Your grandfather won lots of glory but was criticized for slapping two soldier fighting battle fatigued.

I’m not an apologist for my grandfather. I would say that generation of the military just didn’t understand the phenomenon of PTSD.

What makes your work different from other PTSD programs? 

There are wonderful writing programs and theater programs , but there something about them being able to create narrative in this way. They can observe themselves in a video but also participate in them.  From this they can take control of their lives.

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The Army’s New Camouflage Will Hide Soldiers And Tanks In Plain Sight Wherever They Are

The U.S. Army is moving forward on next-generation concealment technology to ensure that American soldiers can hide in plain sight.

Fibrotex has built an Ultra-Light Camouflage Netting System that can be used to conceal soldier’s positions, vehicles, tanks, and aircraft. The new “camouflage system will mask soldiers, vehicles, and installations from state-of-the-art electro-optical sensors and radars,” the company said Thursday in a press release sent to Business Insider.

Fibrotex has been awarded a contract to supply this advanced camouflage to conceal troops from night vision, thermal imaging, radar and more.

Soldiers, vehicles, and other relevant systems can just about disappear in snowy, desert, urban, and woodland environments, according to the camouflage maker.

The new program aims to replace outdated camouflage that protect soldiers in the visible spectrum but not against more advanced, high-end sensors. ULCANS “provides more persistent [infrared], thermal & counter-radar performance,” Fibrotex explained.

The Army has awarded Fibrotex a 10-year indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity contract valued at $480 million. Full-scale production will begin next year at a manufacturing facility in McCreary County, Kentucky, where the company expects to create and secure hundreds of new jobs in the coming years.

“Today, more than ever, military forces and opposition groups are using night vision sensors and thermal devices against our troops,” Eyal Malleron, the CEO of Fibrotex USA, said in a statement.

“But, by using Fibrotex’s camouflage, concealment and deception solutions, we make them undetectable again, allowing them to continue keeping us safe.”

The result came from roughly two years of testing at the Army’s Natick Soldier Systems Center, where new technology was tested against the Army’s most advanced sensors.

Fibrotex noted that the netting is reversible, creating the possibility for two distinctly different prints for varied environments. And while outsiders can’t see through the netting, those on the inside have an excellent view of their surroundings.

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A few personal thoughts for you. Are you having trouble with your daily routine? Are your nights full of restless, sleepless hours?

You are not alone!! Many veterans battle these problems.  This path will lead to a dead end my friends. Get help.! Seek support!!

You can always make a comment here and we will help you in any way we can. You can also call the support line at:

(877-247-4645)

Remember

You are never alone.

You are never forgotten

You are never unloved.

And above all….Never, ever, give up!

 

Boredom and Loneliness Haunt Veterans

Thanks to all of you who have been joining me here. We help bring change to lives. The response has been wonderful.  

We have reached our goal of 4,000!  We will now be giving a prize to the person who is our 4,500th person to subscribe. 

WE HAVE A WINNER!! An email has been sent to our winner! New prizes for the 5,000th subscriber. We now have 4,854!

Help us make it to 5,000 by subscribing today if you haven’t already. This shows you care for veterans. Just click on the icon right after the title of this post and click on FEEDBLITZ , and the posts will come straight to your inbox.                            ____________________________________________________________

Doug Bolton, the founder of the blog, Signs of Hope, which is at www.dailysignsofhope.com, has written a new book, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.” It reaches out the many military and veterans who may be battling anxiety, fear, depression, addictions, rejections, and the many other usual suspects. There are 22 military connected suicides every day. That is almost one every hour. Doug wants to help stop those statistics.  

______________________________________________________________

This is a new social network just for veterans. I joined it and made instant friendships with veterans who want to talk about what I want to talk about. Please check it out. You will be glad you did. 

https://www.rallypoint.com/join/spc-douglas-bolton

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One of the hardest problems veterans face is what happens after transition. This article may help you survive. 

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Veterans face a variety of problems once they leave the service. Whether it’s accurate or not, many veterans feel life is a little harder for them than for most people. But what if a big part of the problem wasn’t so much PTSD or poor transition assistance — at least not directly — but rather loneliness and boredom?

From being under a microscope to being unseen

The best and worst thing about being in the military is that it is all-consuming. It provides you with a place to be and a time to be there, pretty much 24/7/365.

You spend several months at a time deployed. When you get home, you work long hours, so that takes care of a good part of your day. Then you’ve got frost calls at the club on Fridays after work. Another weekend that month you have duty. The next there’s a mandatory fun event of some kind. Your next door neighbors are military too, so they invite you over for dinner every so often.

For better or worse, while you’re in the military, you’re always busy and rarely alone.

In the civilian world, after you walk out the glass doors, no one cares what you do. Outside of blatant misconduct that might discredit your employer, they generally don’t care much about how you live your life. They sure aren’t going to have you sit in an auditorium for eight hours on a workday to talk about why you should wear more sunscreen.

Shot gunning into civilian life is lonely in the best of times

Once you have that DD-214 in hand, your social network changes. Chances are you’ll get a job in a whole new city. Once you’re there, you’re no longer in that protective military cocoon. Your neighbors come and go silently to wherever it is they go. On one side, you have a college student whose parents pay his rent and who apparently commutes by skateboard. On the other, who the hell knows, because you’ve never seen anyone enter or leave — just vague signs of occupancy. You think there might be a serial killer with a torture dungeon living there.

It’s definitely not like the barracks, or even a typical neighborhood street in a military town.

If you do stay around your old duty station, your military friends will still have the demanding schedule you just left — plus you’re probably a sellout contractor, with the logoed polo shirt to prove it. Even if you decide to go back to your old hometown, you aren’t the same person as when you left. Unless you’re picking up that dead-end job right where you left off, you no longer fit in there, either.

Your new coworkers generally scatter to the winds after work. Unlike your previous semi-homogeneous band of mostly young male brothers, now you have a diverse group with lives as different as their backgrounds.

If you’re single or divorced, it’s even worse. You can’t party with the Friday night crowd unless you want to be the sad old guy in the club. If you don’t have children or they don’t usually live with you, you probably aren’t plugged into the whole kids soccer scene (and it would be a little disturbing if you were). Most of your peers are married, so if you aren’t, you probably aren’t going to be hanging out much. No one likes a third wheel. As far as meeting other middle-aged single folks, that guy who spotted you on the bench press at the gym was really cool, but it seemed weird to ask him to hang out after staring up at his crotch for 10 reps.

Falling into a cycle of self-isolation

When you get home you usually have nothing to do. At first, that fills you with sublime joy, but after awhile, having nothing and no one to fill the off-time becomes old. Some people handle that better than others.

Unfortunately, charming old-fashioned solitary pursuits such as painting, solitaire, and playing soulful jazz piano at dirty gin joints are far less common pursuits than things like excessive drinking and internet use. Both of those things are addictive, but they do temporarily relieve boredom and loneliness.

In the case of drinking, without anyone else to watch what you’re doing, that couple of beers after coming home from work easily becomes 3 or 4, maybe even 5 or 6. You aren’t trying to get shitfaced. You’re just hanging out, watching Netflix or playing video games, while sipping a beer. But sipping beers for several hours quickly adds up, even if you’re not trying. Vets have much greater rates of alcohol abuse than the general public.

Then there’s the internet, that great time-suck. It’s the refuge of the lonely, offering instant connections with people around the world. But that virtual companionship can destabilize your remaining relationships in real life.

For vets in particular, there’s a temptation to rekindle camaraderie on any number of vicious and misogynistic social media pages. An online life devoted to mocking civilians and treating women poorly is even more isolating — after shitting on every non-vet, and even vets who don’t live up to your standard (oh good, another POG hatefest), are you really going to go out, be friendly, and find new friends in real life?

Though I’ve wasted too many hours on social media, I’ve never thrown in with the vitriolic Facebook groups. But I see enough reposts of those groups from many of my old colleagues to know that it’s clearly a thing.

As far as alcohol, I’ve had more than my share of beers in a sitting enough times to know that I need to keep an eye on that, if for no other reason than my waistline. Along those lines, there are many other unhealthy time-killers, like overeatingsmoking, and dipping that vets are especially prone to.

Admit you’re lonely. But you’re not alone

The plural of anecdote isn’t data. But it’s indisputable that loneliness and boredom have profound effects on health and wellbeing. I can’t help but wonder if a large portion of the acute mental illness and substance abuse problems among vets might really be just the long-term products of poor social networks after leaving the military.

Some of the military’s and VA’s organizational efforts would be well spent in finding earlier interventions on that front, instead of waiting until vets’ lives go completely sideways.

And on the individual level, it’s just another good reminder to take care of each other. Taking an interest in each other’s lives isn’t a cure-all for our issues, but it does help remind us: We’re not as alone as we think.

If you are struggling with life after the military. You are never alone. We have your six. Get help. Here is a toll free number you can always go to to get help:

1-800-273-8255

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Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all….never, ever, give up!