The Transition to Civilian Life is Tough For the Military

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Just saw a video about Swedish soldiers in training. They looked awesome. They will be great at helping us defend. They are just one of many allies who are preparing for battle.

This tells me that we are in good shape at this time. We had trouble getting support in the past. Very reassuring.

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There are rumors that President Trump is going to have the National Guard watching polling places. What do you think of that? I am in favor of that after seeing how many cases of fraud and destroying of ballots have occurred already. What ever we can do to have a vailed election.

My state has had mail in ballots for years. Seems to work here, but states that have never had it before have too many chances for mistakes.

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I lost a very close buddy a couple of weeks ago. He was a veteran like me. He was out riding his bike and had a heart attack. The loss is extremely hard. Still grieving over it.

Have you lost a Military buddy? I have lost three total. Each one was devastating to me.

Two were while I was on active duty. I shared these stories in an earlier posts.

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What many of us face when we get out of the military is acceptance. The transition is hard, at best. Some adjust quickly, but others who deal with PTSD, TBI, depression, etc., have a hard time facing the world. It is those that I am reaching out to in my upcoming book, Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of life.

I share my own stories, and then relate them to the reader as how to overcome their fears.

One story I shared in the book was about a day I was on Hill 468 in Korea. I was running a line for teletyping. I was to listen to the airways for breaches of security. As I was doing this the light and the equipment started shutting down. I went out and found that the generator was out of gas.

I climbed up on the big generator with a can of gas. Just about when I was finished, I started to fall. I was going to land very hard if I didn’t grab something. Unfortunately what I grabbed, was the manifold of the generator. It severely burnt my hand. I got back into the hut with severe pain. The skin was burnt off of my left hand.

Now what??

I had to continue to monitor the airways. I had to use only my right hand to operate things. My left hand was wrapped in a make shift bandage.

Why didn’t I radio down to the headquarters for help? My military training taught me that I can’t leave my post. Stay there and be strong.

I used that story to reach out to those who face trouble and want to run. Face your problems no matter what.

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Remember:

You are nor alone.

You are not forsaken.

You are not unloved.

And above all…never, ever, give up!

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+If you like what you see, please subscribe at the top of this page where it says, “subscribe.” When you do, all future posts will come directly to your inbox. Also, if you know some else who could benefit for the site, please let them know about it. Your comments will not be seen by other people, just me, and I will connect with you to see if you are OK to share it.

Many Military Had Loneliness While in Korea

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Doug Bolton, the founder of the blog, Signs of Hope, which is at www.dailysignsofhope.com, has written a new book, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.” It will be reaching out the many military and veterans who may be battling anxiety, fear, depression, addictions, rejections, and the many other usual suspects. There are 22 military connected suicides ever day. That is almost one every hour. Doug wants to help stop those statistics. Doug sent off his mini proposal to an agent who is very interested in his concept. We will update you when we hear more. 

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Well, I told you in my last post I would share with you more from one of the chapters in the new book, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.”

The one I have selected for today is talking about loneliness. One of the hardest things to adjust to and being alone quite often while you serve. This chapter talks about the loneliness I faced in Korea:

Loneliness in Korea

Many civilians do not understand how you can be lonely when you have so many other military around you.

It may be hard to understand, but all these other military are from all over the country, and do not relate to your needs to connect you to your home. They all have their owns worlds of loneliness from not hearing from their own loved ones.

There worst of my personal loneliness was while I was stationed in Korea. We were stationed on a small base called Camp Red Cloud. There weren’t a lot of military there. We were stationed there to keep the peace, and monitor the radio waves to make sure there were no breaches of security. We were the Army Security Agency.

Being there made me feel real isolated. I was in a foreign country  that didn’t speak my language.

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The chapter goes on how the people there didn’t even want us to be there. Some locals threw rocks at the military trucks as they went by.

I also mention that during my working long twelve hour working days,  I was stationed on top of hill 468 and I was the only one there. Talk about loneliness. The silence was deafening!

You were alone and couldn’t call down to the base for help. There wasn’t anyone to come.

During the shift and during of the silence you had time to think of home, about the girlfriend you left behind. You think about the fun times such as fishing in the lake near the farm where I grew up.

I share in the chapter how I made it through the loneliness, by writing a journal, reading tons of books, and writing real letters and send them home in the mail.

In the end of the chapter I share some thoughts on helping the reader through their loneliness:

” Loneliness is a direct cause of depression, and sadness. Try to fill your life in the military with things you enjoy. Don’t sit and think of negative things. Don’t hide from the world where you are stationed overseas. Find things to fill your day that will change your attitude, and give you hope.”

In the future posts I will share parts of other chapters to give you a feeling of what is printed.

Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never, ever, give up!