Following Orders Was a Must in the MIlitary, because Your life Depended on it

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No current news today

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Here are a couple more basic training stories:

My company went together to the grenade range.

It looked fairly easy. Just just be in the bunker, pull pin, and throw. Well of course, the guy right ahead of me had his grenade slip out of his hands and the instructor got him away before he could get injured.

So, I wasn’t as confident when I stepped in.He reminded me what happened to the soldier ahead of me, and repeated, “Take grenade, pull pin, and throw.”

I did exactly what he said to do, and I was successful. What I learned from that was, not matter how cocky you think you are be alert, and do exactly what you are told. That was the common thought throughout basic training.

My drill sergeant was a feisty guy.

He was only 5’7″ at best, but he definitely in charge. He would get in your face and scream if you did something wrong. He seemed very angry at those times, but I later realized that he was just trying to make us good soldiers.

He spent one Sunday working over me verbally. He had me go out in the parade ground and dig a big hole. He handed me his cigarette and told me to bury it there. I was able to do that with much sweat and grunting.

When I was finished burying it he said, “Dig it up again!” Al I said back to him was “Yes, Sargeant.” Of course, I had to fill up the hole again.

Towards the end of basic, he came to talk to me privately. He said, “I have been very hard on you. I wanted to see what you were made of. I liked what I saw, so I am nominating your for soldier of the month.”

I wasn’t selected as Soldier of the Month, by just the honor of being nominated was enough. He went on to name me an honor guard. We were in several parades.

What I learned from all of that was that there are times when you have to learn to accept orders, and do them quickly. That really prepared me for active duty.

Both of these stories are in my upcoming book, Signs of Hope for the Military: In an Out of the Trenches of Life. Many more are there.

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How was your basic training?

Fun and Games, or do you have some bad memories from it?

You are not alone, my friend. There are over 11,500 fellow veterans here who have your back.

I remember a few guys who didn’t make it through basic. It was just too much for them.

If you have had some not so good memories from the military, and they control you, GET HELP!

Here is a toll free number to call 24/7. It has highly qualified counselors there to help you. They will not hang up until they know you are ok.

Do not take on this not so friendly world alone.

1-800-273-8255 Option # 1

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Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never, ever, give up!

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Outline of a New Military Book

Got to pass this on to you before I get into my regular post On July 19th we had 8,601 subscribers. Today we have 8,765! That is a 64 increase in just twelve days. FANTASTIC!!!

Welcome to you all!

+If you like what you see, please subscribe at the top of this page where it says, “subscribe.” When you do all future posts will come directly to your inbox. Also, if you know some else who could benefit for the site, please let them know about it. You may be saving a life. Your comments will not be seen by other people, just me, and I will connect with you to see if you are OK to share it.

Today I am going to tell you about my upcoming book, Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.ry

I will share an outline with you to help you get the feel of what the book will have:

  1. The first part of the book will be stories about my basic training. There were some very funny things that happen and others that weren’t so funny. I will give a short sampling: 1. A recruit let a grenade slip out of his hand. 2. Our platoon was marched into a bay. 3. My drill sergeant got into a fight and won. 4. Had a terrible time with the drill sergeant at first and then we were best friends.
  2. Then I will be talking about my deployment to Korea. There were some scary times. 1. Three of us went there on the buddy system. Only two came back. 2. A buddy suffocated in a honey bucket. 3. Had a good/bad time while on R&R in Tokyo. 4. I got a Colonel busted.
  3. Then my time at Ft Bragg will be shared. Some scary times. 1. Almost got busted for stealing gas. 2. Sat on a runway in a plane ready to go the Bay of Pigs. 3. Got married by a funny Justice of the Peace. 4. When I got, out my wife and I traveled across the U.S. in a bus, and she was pregnant.

There are many, many, more stories in the book, but my favorite part is the actual interviews I had with veterans in the trenches.

  1. One soldier watched his buddies burn to death in a humvee. 2. A WWII veteran begged to get a transport plane with his buddy, and the plane he was supposed to be on crashed killing everyone. 3. A sniper killed many enemy, but lost over 13 of his buddies. 4. A Marine saw his buddy in a helicopter crash into the ocean.

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I hope this has you feeling at least interested in the book. It will help many soldiers that are battling PTSD, TBI, depression, War wounds, anxiety, etc.

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How are you doing my friend. Have you been overwhelmed with the transition to civilian life? Do you dread mixing with other people?

You certainly are not alone!

There are 8,765 fellow veterans here who have your back.

Here is a toll free number to call if you are exhausted and overwhelmed. Do not feel you are a sissy for getting help. Some people may try to tell you that. They are totally wrong.

1-800-273-8255

Call it now if you need it. The people there are very qualified to help you.

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+If you like what you see, please subscribe at the top of this page where it says, “subscribe.” When you do all future posts will come directly to your inbox. Also, if you know some else who could benefit for the site, please let them know about it. You may be saving a life. Your comments will not be seen by other people, just me, and I will connect with you to see if you are OK to share it.

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Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all….never, ever, give up!

Two WWII Veteran Interviews

Thanks to all of you who have been joining us here. The response has been wonderful .  We just past 3,300 new subscribers. That is a huge increase in 2015. We only had 1,000 a year ago. Help us to make it to 4,000.  Could you be the one that puts us over the top? Our goal for the end of this year is 6,000.

Help us continue to grow by subscribing today if you haven’t already. Just click on the icon right after the title of this post to do that.

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Doug Bolton, the founder of the blog, Signs of Hope, which is at www.dailysignsofhope.com, has written a new book, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.” It will be reaching out the many military and veterans who may be battling anxiety, fear, depression, addictions, rejections, and the many other usual suspects. There are 22 military connected suicides every day. That is almost one every hour. Doug wants to help stop those statistics. Doug sent off his mini proposal to an agent who is very interested in his concept. We will update you when we hear more. 

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Sorry… it has been a while since I last posted. been some illnesses, other commitments, etc.

Things are happening with my new book, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.”

On my blog http://www.dailysignsofhope.com. People have been coming in by the thousands to read my excerpts of interviews I have done with veterans. I had one high day of 5,879 hits in one day.

That tells me people are interested in anything that supports our military. I am blessed to be a veteran, and through my interviews I can see that we need to reach out to anyone who is a veteran. As I mentioned in the introduction section, there are 22 veteran suicides a day!

That is not acceptable. I will share here some a couple of the interviews I had with you here, and you can go to my blog at: http://www.dailysignsofhope.com to see others.

One interview I had was with a WWII veteran. He wasn’t too excited to talk about his time during the war, but he did share this:

Me- “What unit were you attached to?” Veteran- ” I was part of the tank Corp.” Me- “What was the worst moment you had during that time?”  Veteran- ” We were stopped to look out over a field ahead of us. We had the top open. A Japanese soldier dropped a grenade on us, and it killed my best friend to my side, and all of the rest of us were wounded.”

This veteran received to Purple Heart, and a Medal of Honor. It was difficult for me to go through the interview with this man. The reason was, he was my Uncle. I had known him from me birth, but didn’t know this story until the interview.

Another WWII veteran I spoke to is still alive today. He is ninety-two years old:

Me- “What branch of the Army were you in?” Veteran- “The infantry.” Me- “What was you worst moments during that time?” Veteran- “During a battle, I was wounded. I had to lay on the battle field pretending I was dead while the German soldiers came through to check the bodies.”

This Veteran also nearly broke my heart, because he also is my Uncle, and I didn’t know his story until I interviewed him.

Those are very shortened versions of the two interviews I had with these men. I also had interviews with a WWII nurse, three Vietnam military, and a couple Iraq and Afghanistan veterans. I am searching for more interviews, so if you are a veteran and are open to talking to me about your experience, leave a comment below and I will get back to you. No one has to have their name mentioned in the book.

I want you to know something right now. If you are a veteran or a family member/friend of a veteran, know that someone cares. You are not alone. You are not forsaken. You are not unloved.

One last plea is that you never, ever, give up!