Stories of Near Death Experiences and Some very Funny Moments

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Some military news:

“We’ve got to keep pushing on this” Sgt. Maj. of the Army Michael Grinston talked about the branch’s efforts to prevent more soldiers like Spc. Vanessa Guillén from being sexually harassed and murdered. Thursday marked exactly a year since Guillén first went missing: and her death forced a reckoning within the Army on how it treats its lower enlisted soldiers, particularly women.
“They leaned into the danger, firing as fast as they could” was how Marine Gen. John Kelly described the last moments of Cpl. Jonathan Yale and Lance Cpl. Jordan Haerter, two Marine grunts who died exactly 13 years ago Thursday while trying to stop a truck carrying 2,000 pounds of explosives as it barreled toward their post in Ramadi, Iraq. Marine veteran and Task & Purpose deputy editor James Clark remembered the fallen infantrymen and the lives they led in a moving story. Both Marines were posthumously awarded the Navy Cross for their actions that day.

Speaking of sacrifice, Navy vet Stephanie Kroot is one of only 50 or so Americans to have donated two of her organs to two separate people, literally giving parts of herself to save the lives of strangers. But those donations are only the latest episodes in Kroot’s long life of service, which includes stints as a police officer, a Navy intelligence specialist, and a critical care nurse. Yeah, she’s good people.

There’s a first time for everything, like sending a general officer to court-martial, as the Air Force found out on Wednesday when it referred a sexual assault charge against Maj. Gen. William T. Cooley to a general court-martial.The former commander of the Air Force Research Laboratory, Cooley is the first Air Force general in the branch’s 73-year history to be court-martialed, though he’s far from the first to be accused of sexual misconduct.

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There are many soldiers who aren’t happy with the way our country is going. Many have joined ranks and formed their own groups. This is not good. We need to stand together and correct the problem. We do not need hundreds of splinter groups.

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Update on my upcoming book, Signs of Hope of the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of life.

It has been a long time since I last shared the outline of my book. I think it is very helpful to share this to let our kow what is coming.

This is the order that it is written:

  1. Basic training. Lots of funny stuff happened plus some good stuff happened.
  2. Mos training- FT Gordon, GA. Got hit with a hurricane. Fast and furious training.
  3. Korea- Here is where I learned about life. Just a teenager, and facing the dark side of life. Lost two buddies there as well.
  4. FT Bragg, NC. Got a huge scare with the Bay of Pigs incident.

Each section of the main book, will have many pages of things I faced and how I faced them. Some were life threatening. Some were embarrassing. Some were as stupid is and stupid does.

Another section will be interviews with soldiers who were actually in the field. Like WWII, Afghanistan, Iraq, Vietnam, etc.

Many of the interviews will have life threatening stories. Too many of the interviews were with buddies fighting PTSD, TBI, war wounds, etc.

The third section will Appendix #1.

Appendix #1 will have pages and pages of help for you and how to use them.

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How are you doing? Is the mile you walk in life, seem more like a marathon? Is it too difficult to continue the battle?

FEAR NOT!

There are over 11,880 fellow veterans here who have your back. Many of them are people I have met and are sharing some of their lives.

Please know, that if it is just to much for you right now, GET HELP!!

Here is a toll free number that is 24/7.

There are highly trained counselors there to help you. They will not hang up until they know you are OK.

Never, ever, face this world alone!

1-800-273-8255 Option # 1

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Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And never, ever, give up!

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We All Have bad Moments in Serving. We Do Not Need to Face Them Alone

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A short bit of news sn then a story or two from my service time.

It’s time the US military finally bans troops from joining extremist groups.

The Air Force may change its height standard to hire more enlisted aviators.
The Air Force may soon change its outdated height requirements to hire more career enlisted aviators, particularly women.
Marine Corps releases pregnant Marine physical training handbook.

DARPA is developing an air-launched drone missile that fires air-to-air missiles.

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I have hundreds of stories from my days in the military. What follows is just one of them that will be in my upcoming book, Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of life.

While in basic training I was doing my firing range testing. This 18 year old kid have never held a rifle before. The loud noise of all those rifles going off were deafening.

It was my turn to shoot. The instructor showed me how to get down on the ground and wrap my arm around the sling. He then spread my feet behind me, and said, “Open fire!”

I started shooting, and the targets were falling down. I didn’t miss one of them. The instructor was amazed and said, “Didn’t you tell me you had never held a rifle before?”

“Yes sir,”I said.

He had me step back to let the next group of men to fire. This went on for a while, and finally everyone had had a chance to shoot.

The Head sergeant then read of the names of those who was able to shot in the second round, and he had the rest go to another range. I was one of those who stayed. I couldn’t believe it. I was able to be in the second round of shooting?

They moved the targets back another 50 yards, and we commenced to shot again. I hit every target. I was getting used to my rifle. At the end of the second round, they called out the group for the third round. I was chosen again!!

The third round was much harder, they put the target at 100 yards.

My instructor then told me about “kentucky windage.” That is where you aim a little high to allow the wind to bring down your bullet.

I missed one target there, but I had enough to make it to the final round.

The final round was 150 yards. That is one and a half football fields.

Again my instructor showed me how to allow for a little more windage. there were on six of us shooting now.

I only missed two shots the whole round. They gathered us together to let us know how the last group did.

They named one guy that won the whole thing. He had only missed one the whole day.

To my shock they named me second. I had only missed three all day.

They told me I was an expert shooter, and this was from a kid that had never held a rifle before.

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Time to check in….

How are you doing? Do you remember your basic training days. Was it a good experience?

Did you get some troubled times during basic? How about the rest of your time in the service? Not so good?

Not to worry my friend. There are over 11,500 fellow veterans here who have your back.

If you are overwhelmed with nightmares and painful memories, GET HELP!!

Here is a toll free number to call 24/7.

It has highly qualified counselors there to help you. They will not hang up until they know you are OK.

Do not try to take on this world alone!!!

1-800-273-8255 Option # 1

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Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never, ever, give up!

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+If you like what you see, please subscribe at the top of this page where it says, “subscribe.” When you do, all future posts will come directly to your inbox. Also, if you know some else who could benefit from this site, please let them know about it

Why does the Army Helicopters Have Native American Names? Because 32 Them Earned the Medal of Honor

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This story is very interesting so I decided to share it all.

Here’s why Army helicopters have Native American names.

Black Hawk. Apache. Comanche. Lakota. Notice anything?

The Army’s history of naming its helicopters after Native American tribes and figures stems from an Army regulation made decades ago. The regulation has since been rescinded, but the tradition has carried on over the years.

An Army press release posted Wednesday explained the backstory of the U.S. military’s “long history” with Native Americans — and specifically the American Indian Wars.

“But Native Americans also served as some of the fiercest fighters for the United States for more than 200 years,” the release said. “In fact, 32 Native Americans have earned the nation’s highest military award, the Medal of Honor.”

The tradition originated from Army Gen. Hamilton Howze, who was tasked with the job to “develop doctrine and the way forward when it came to employing Army aircraft” after the Air Force split from the Army in 1947, the Army release said.

The original names for two helicopters were “Hoverfly” and “Dragonfly” — which Howze didn’t like. He decided the next helicopter would be called the Sioux “in honor of the Native Americans who fought Army soldiers in the Sioux Wars and defeated the 7th Cavalry Regiment at the Battle of Little Bighorn.”

And from that decision, years later in 1969, Army Regulation 70-28 was born.

AR 70-28 required that Army aircraft had to be named after “Indian terms and names of American Indian tribes and chiefs.” It also directed that tanks would be named after American generals, infantry weapons “would receive names for famous early American pioneers,” and assault weapons would have “fearsome reptile and insect names,” according to the press release.

Though the regulation has since been rescinded, the tradition for Army helicopters was set.

A press release further explained the process behind deciding on a name for an Army helicopter, saying that before the service could use the name Lakota for the UH-72A Lakota, the Lakota tribe was consulted for permission.

The Bureau of Indian Affairs advised Stephen Hart, a Light Utility Helicopter maintenance manager, that the Army “had to contact and obtain approval from a majority of the council members making up the Sioux Nation,” of which the Lakotas are a part.

Within six months, the Army had received the permission they needed. The Army wanted that name specifically, the press release said, because the Lakotas “were known as a peaceful, non-aggressive people,” and the helicopter “is a non-arms-bearing helicopter that performs medical and casualty evacuations, provides disaster relief, aids in homeland defense, and also works to counter drugs and narcotics.”

In February 2008, Rosebud Sioux tribal leaders joined the Army for a ceremony at Redstone Arsenal, Ala., to celebrate the new helicopter.

Rodney Bordeaux, the Rosebud Sioux tribal council president, said at the ceremony that it was a “great honor to have our name out there now where people can see it.”

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Too many of our veterans are bitter and lost. They came home with PTSD, severe TBI, and war wounds. It is hard to reach them because they do not want to show weakness.

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That leads me into my daily rant.

How are you doing? Are the paths you are walking breaking down and causing landslides for you?

Rest at ease! There are over 11, 450 fellow veterans here who have you back. You are not alone,. There is no need for you to take on this world by yourself.

However, if the path doesn’t look repairable, GET HELP!

Here is a toll free number to call, 24/7.

There are highly qualified, counselors there to help you. They will not hang up until they know you are OK.

Never take on the dark side by yourself.

1-800-273-8255 Option # 1

__________________________________

Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never, ever, Give up!

____________________________________

+If you like what you see, please subscribe at the top of this page where it says, “subscribe.” When you do, all future posts will come directly to your inbox. Also, if you know some else who could benefit from this site, please let them know about it.