So Many Unsung Heroes in the MIlitary That we Need to Honor

+If you like what you see, please subscribe at the top of this page where it says, “subscribe.” When you do, all future posts will come directly to your inbox. Also, if you know some else who could benefit from this site, please let them know about it.

___________________________________

I wasn’t able to post on Friday. I had surgery on that day. It was to replace a battery in my defibrillator. Still slowly recovering today.

I can see you weren’t too excited about my post last Wednesday. It was a report about sexual harassment and rape. Sorry if it offended you, but we have to face it and follow through in helping those afflicted.

___________________________________

Times are not exactly fun right now. Our country is in turmoil. Lots of verbal fighting. Seems there a division right down the middle of our country as to beliefs.

__________________________________

There are many reports of heroic feats by the military. That tells me that people in the military are special people. Here is a story about another hero:

__________________________________

Marine awarded for saving drowning couple from rough waters in California.

When Cpl. Jordan Perez heard a couple calling for help, he ripped off his boots and sprang into action. The Marine saw two civilian kayakers, their vessel capsized in the waters of 21 Area Boat Basin, a training section for amphibious vehicles at Camp Pendleton, California that opens up onto the Pacific Ocean.

It was around 1 p.m. on Feb. 15, and large, sharp boulders in the basin had caused strong waves that flipped the kayak, leaving the kayakers struggling in the water.

“That’s when I took action,” said Perez in a recent press release. A combat engineer with 7th Engineer Support Battalion, 1st Marine Logistics Group, Perez was working at a nearby construction project when another Marine noticed the drowning couple. “I took my boots off and just started swimming.”

The Marine swam 250 meters through the choppy waves to reach the kayakers. He grabbed the woman’s hand, pulled her back on the kayak and started pushing the boat back to the rocks. The woman’s husband could swim, but he started panicking halfway to the shore. Perez swam back to the man, put a life jacket on him, and continued pushing the woman to safety.

Perez was in the right spot at the right time: while other Marines also noticed the drowning couple, he happened to be training with a retired reconnaissance Marine to prepare for assessment and selection with the Marine Raiders. Part of that training includes swimming two hours every day.

“That [training] takes away any hesitation that comes with putting your own life at risk,” Perez said. “Since I had been training, I was confident that I could get myself out there and get those people back.”

Perez was awarded a challenge coin from Brig. Gen. Dan Conley, the commanding general of Marine Corps Installations West, Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, on Feb. 19th. Though Perez technically does not fall under Conley’s command, the general wanted to personally thank him for what he did. A challenge coin is presented to Marines who go above and beyond, and any further awards will be processed by his chain of command, the press release explained.

“I’d like to believe a lot of people would do what you did, but I know they wouldn’t,” Conley told him. “So, to hear it actually happen is just amazing. That was really gutsy of you.”

But it’s just par for the Corps, as far as Perez is concerned.

“It’s what Marines are expected to do,” he said.

___________________________________

His instinct saved lives, and left yet another reminder how special our military is.

Do you have a story about a hero? Share it in the comments below. I would love to post it.

__________________________________

Time to talk about you. How are you doing? Is everything going in the right direction, or has your path been altered?

You are not alone. There are over 11,550 fellow veterans here who have your back.

Of course if your struggling is too hard for you right now, GET HELP!

Here is a toll free number to cal 24/7 There are highly qualified counselors to to help you. They will not hang up until they know you are OK.

Never take on this crazy world alone!

1-800-273-8255 Option # 1

___________________________________

Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never, ever, give up!

____________________________________

+If you like what you see, please subscribe at the top of this page where it says, “subscribe.” When you do, all future posts will come directly to your inbox. Also, if you know some else who could benefit from this site, please let them know about it.

Why does the Army Helicopters Have Native American Names? Because 32 Them Earned the Medal of Honor

+If you like what you see, please subscribe at the top of this page where it says, “subscribe.” When you do, all future posts will come directly to your inbox. Also, if you know some else who could benefit from this site, please let them know about it

______________________________________________________

This story is very interesting so I decided to share it all.

Here’s why Army helicopters have Native American names.

Black Hawk. Apache. Comanche. Lakota. Notice anything?

The Army’s history of naming its helicopters after Native American tribes and figures stems from an Army regulation made decades ago. The regulation has since been rescinded, but the tradition has carried on over the years.

An Army press release posted Wednesday explained the backstory of the U.S. military’s “long history” with Native Americans — and specifically the American Indian Wars.

“But Native Americans also served as some of the fiercest fighters for the United States for more than 200 years,” the release said. “In fact, 32 Native Americans have earned the nation’s highest military award, the Medal of Honor.”

The tradition originated from Army Gen. Hamilton Howze, who was tasked with the job to “develop doctrine and the way forward when it came to employing Army aircraft” after the Air Force split from the Army in 1947, the Army release said.

The original names for two helicopters were “Hoverfly” and “Dragonfly” — which Howze didn’t like. He decided the next helicopter would be called the Sioux “in honor of the Native Americans who fought Army soldiers in the Sioux Wars and defeated the 7th Cavalry Regiment at the Battle of Little Bighorn.”

And from that decision, years later in 1969, Army Regulation 70-28 was born.

AR 70-28 required that Army aircraft had to be named after “Indian terms and names of American Indian tribes and chiefs.” It also directed that tanks would be named after American generals, infantry weapons “would receive names for famous early American pioneers,” and assault weapons would have “fearsome reptile and insect names,” according to the press release.

Though the regulation has since been rescinded, the tradition for Army helicopters was set.

A press release further explained the process behind deciding on a name for an Army helicopter, saying that before the service could use the name Lakota for the UH-72A Lakota, the Lakota tribe was consulted for permission.

The Bureau of Indian Affairs advised Stephen Hart, a Light Utility Helicopter maintenance manager, that the Army “had to contact and obtain approval from a majority of the council members making up the Sioux Nation,” of which the Lakotas are a part.

Within six months, the Army had received the permission they needed. The Army wanted that name specifically, the press release said, because the Lakotas “were known as a peaceful, non-aggressive people,” and the helicopter “is a non-arms-bearing helicopter that performs medical and casualty evacuations, provides disaster relief, aids in homeland defense, and also works to counter drugs and narcotics.”

In February 2008, Rosebud Sioux tribal leaders joined the Army for a ceremony at Redstone Arsenal, Ala., to celebrate the new helicopter.

Rodney Bordeaux, the Rosebud Sioux tribal council president, said at the ceremony that it was a “great honor to have our name out there now where people can see it.”

__________________________________

Too many of our veterans are bitter and lost. They came home with PTSD, severe TBI, and war wounds. It is hard to reach them because they do not want to show weakness.

___________________________________

That leads me into my daily rant.

How are you doing? Are the paths you are walking breaking down and causing landslides for you?

Rest at ease! There are over 11, 450 fellow veterans here who have you back. You are not alone,. There is no need for you to take on this world by yourself.

However, if the path doesn’t look repairable, GET HELP!

Here is a toll free number to call, 24/7.

There are highly qualified, counselors there to help you. They will not hang up until they know you are OK.

Never take on the dark side by yourself.

1-800-273-8255 Option # 1

__________________________________

Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never, ever, Give up!

____________________________________

+If you like what you see, please subscribe at the top of this page where it says, “subscribe.” When you do, all future posts will come directly to your inbox. Also, if you know some else who could benefit from this site, please let them know about it.

Met Some New Veterans by accident. We were Instant Buddies.

+If you like what you see, please subscribe at the top of this page where it says, “subscribe.” When you do, all future posts will come directly to your inbox. Also, if you know some else who could benefit from this site, please let them know about it.

___________________________________

Latest military news

The Marine Corps is eyeing a long-range robot boat that can nail targets with kamikaze drones.

9 Fort Bliss soldiers released from the hospital after ingesting antifreeze.

Russian fighter jet buzzes USS Donald Cook in the Black Sea.

The Army just got its hands on its most advanced Apache helicopter yet
The Army’s first contingent of AH-64E version 6 (V6) Apaches has joined 1-229th Attack Reconnaissance Battalion.
.

VA has capacity to administer 600,000 vaccine doses a week

VA is delivering vaccines at more than 215 sites across the country, with plans to expand to additional sites as vaccine supplies increase.

RallyPoint members pay tribute to Veterans during the pandemic

More than 370 RallyPoint members visited gravesites for fellow Veterans and their families and posted photos on the military network site, allowing a virtual visit for those unable to travel in person. 

The Army is evaluating a brand new anti-tank missile for its arsenal.

__________________________________

Many interesting bits of news today. Now I am going to be talking directly to you.

I was able to get my second COVID-19 shot today. It was smooth and quick. I saw many veterans inside getting their shots. To top that, the National Guard is running it.

I am feeling OK so far. They say the second day is the real test.

___________________________________

Yesterday, I got my haircut in Waldport, Oregon.

It is a nice getaway for my wife and I at the Oregon Coast.

I was waiting my turn when my hair lady let me know that the guy she just finished with was the guy I called for an interview several months ago.

I was in shock. I had never met him in person. I went up to him and explained who I was, and he was excited to meet me.

He has a great story and it will be in my upcoming book, Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.

He is a vietnam veteran, and has a very funny story as part of his interview. I will give you a clue. It deals with a monkey.

Also, while I was there, my hair lady told me there was another veteran in the place. She pointed him out and I went to him to greet him.

He is a Coast Guard veteran. We do not give them the credit they are due.

I told him when I was in, and he said he was in 61-65. I was in from 59-62, so we over lapped. He got a little excited and said he was on alert for the Bay of Pigs endeavor. I told came him I was too. We became instant buddies.

He has agreed to do an interview with me and he will be in the book as well.

___________________________________

My next post will talk about the fear and hardships of troops on the front lines. I will sharing about WWII veterans and Afghanistan soldiers. I hope their stories will get your interest. They all will be in the book as well.

___________________________________

Time to do bed check. How are you making it in this not so friendly world? Getting too overwhelming?

Not to worry my friend, there are over 11,300 fellow veterans here who have your back.

However, if it is pulling you down like a huge magnate, GET HELP!

Here is a toll free number to call 24/7. It has highly qualified counselors there to help you, and it is all free. They will not hang up until they know you are OK.

DO NOT FACE THIS WORLD ALONE!

1-800-273-8255 Option # 1

__________________________________

Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never, ever, give up!

__________________________________

+If you like what you see, please subscribe at the top of this page where it says, “subscribe.” When you do, all future posts will come directly to your inbox. Also, if you know some else who could benefit from this site, please let them know about it.