The Transition to Civilian Life is Tough For the Military

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Just saw a video about Swedish soldiers in training. They looked awesome. They will be great at helping us defend. They are just one of many allies who are preparing for battle.

This tells me that we are in good shape at this time. We had trouble getting support in the past. Very reassuring.

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There are rumors that President Trump is going to have the National Guard watching polling places. What do you think of that? I am in favor of that after seeing how many cases of fraud and destroying of ballots have occurred already. What ever we can do to have a vailed election.

My state has had mail in ballots for years. Seems to work here, but states that have never had it before have too many chances for mistakes.

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I lost a very close buddy a couple of weeks ago. He was a veteran like me. He was out riding his bike and had a heart attack. The loss is extremely hard. Still grieving over it.

Have you lost a Military buddy? I have lost three total. Each one was devastating to me.

Two were while I was on active duty. I shared these stories in an earlier posts.

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What many of us face when we get out of the military is acceptance. The transition is hard, at best. Some adjust quickly, but others who deal with PTSD, TBI, depression, etc., have a hard time facing the world. It is those that I am reaching out to in my upcoming book, Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of life.

I share my own stories, and then relate them to the reader as how to overcome their fears.

One story I shared in the book was about a day I was on Hill 468 in Korea. I was running a line for teletyping. I was to listen to the airways for breaches of security. As I was doing this the light and the equipment started shutting down. I went out and found that the generator was out of gas.

I climbed up on the big generator with a can of gas. Just about when I was finished, I started to fall. I was going to land very hard if I didn’t grab something. Unfortunately what I grabbed, was the manifold of the generator. It severely burnt my hand. I got back into the hut with severe pain. The skin was burnt off of my left hand.

Now what??

I had to continue to monitor the airways. I had to use only my right hand to operate things. My left hand was wrapped in a make shift bandage.

Why didn’t I radio down to the headquarters for help? My military training taught me that I can’t leave my post. Stay there and be strong.

I used that story to reach out to those who face trouble and want to run. Face your problems no matter what.

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Remember:

You are nor alone.

You are not forsaken.

You are not unloved.

And above all…never, ever, give up!

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+If you like what you see, please subscribe at the top of this page where it says, “subscribe.” When you do, all future posts will come directly to your inbox. Also, if you know some else who could benefit for the site, please let them know about it. Your comments will not be seen by other people, just me, and I will connect with you to see if you are OK to share it.

Outline of a New Military Book

Got to pass this on to you before I get into my regular post On July 19th we had 8,601 subscribers. Today we have 8,765! That is a 64 increase in just twelve days. FANTASTIC!!!

Welcome to you all!

+If you like what you see, please subscribe at the top of this page where it says, “subscribe.” When you do all future posts will come directly to your inbox. Also, if you know some else who could benefit for the site, please let them know about it. You may be saving a life. Your comments will not be seen by other people, just me, and I will connect with you to see if you are OK to share it.

Today I am going to tell you about my upcoming book, Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.ry

I will share an outline with you to help you get the feel of what the book will have:

  1. The first part of the book will be stories about my basic training. There were some very funny things that happen and others that weren’t so funny. I will give a short sampling: 1. A recruit let a grenade slip out of his hand. 2. Our platoon was marched into a bay. 3. My drill sergeant got into a fight and won. 4. Had a terrible time with the drill sergeant at first and then we were best friends.
  2. Then I will be talking about my deployment to Korea. There were some scary times. 1. Three of us went there on the buddy system. Only two came back. 2. A buddy suffocated in a honey bucket. 3. Had a good/bad time while on R&R in Tokyo. 4. I got a Colonel busted.
  3. Then my time at Ft Bragg will be shared. Some scary times. 1. Almost got busted for stealing gas. 2. Sat on a runway in a plane ready to go the Bay of Pigs. 3. Got married by a funny Justice of the Peace. 4. When I got, out my wife and I traveled across the U.S. in a bus, and she was pregnant.

There are many, many, more stories in the book, but my favorite part is the actual interviews I had with veterans in the trenches.

  1. One soldier watched his buddies burn to death in a humvee. 2. A WWII veteran begged to get a transport plane with his buddy, and the plane he was supposed to be on crashed killing everyone. 3. A sniper killed many enemy, but lost over 13 of his buddies. 4. A Marine saw his buddy in a helicopter crash into the ocean.

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I hope this has you feeling at least interested in the book. It will help many soldiers that are battling PTSD, TBI, depression, War wounds, anxiety, etc.

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How are you doing my friend. Have you been overwhelmed with the transition to civilian life? Do you dread mixing with other people?

You certainly are not alone!

There are 8,765 fellow veterans here who have your back.

Here is a toll free number to call if you are exhausted and overwhelmed. Do not feel you are a sissy for getting help. Some people may try to tell you that. They are totally wrong.

1-800-273-8255

Call it now if you need it. The people there are very qualified to help you.

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+If you like what you see, please subscribe at the top of this page where it says, “subscribe.” When you do all future posts will come directly to your inbox. Also, if you know some else who could benefit for the site, please let them know about it. You may be saving a life. Your comments will not be seen by other people, just me, and I will connect with you to see if you are OK to share it.

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Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all….never, ever, give up!