We All Need to send Letters to Our Troops Deployed. It Makes Them Feel Loved

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One of the hardest things for a soldier to go through is not getting mail from home. I had that happen to me, while I was in Korea, I got very few letters from home.

Back then there were no Skype, Zoom, smart phones, etc.

I hated to go to mail call. I could see the excitement in the eyes of guys who got their mail, but I seldom got any.

I got a letter once and awhile from my mother, but none from anyone else. I didn’t know how much that would affect me. It did, and when my son was in Iraq, I sent him at least one letter every week, and told others to write to him.

He kept many of his letters, and stated that he would reread them often while there.

Never forget!

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One of the interesting things I did while in the military was going on R&R. (Rest and recuperation.)

A buddy and I were sent to Tokyo, Japan for a week. My first ever paid vacation.

There was such much to do there. We walked the streets and saw all the vendors selling their goods. We also saw pagodas, Japanese Gardens, etc.

One night when we was walking we saw a bar that looked enticing.(Remember, we were still teenagers.)

Found they didn’t care what age you were, they sold you beer.

We sat down and had a few beers. There was a DJ playing music, and much of it was disco type music. This is long before it became popular in the the U.S. This was 1960. You could tell it was the hang out for GI’s. Most of the place full of American military.

Then the DJ stopped playing and announced there was a contest starting.

The contest was that belly dancer was coming out, and we were to see how long we could hold onto her hips while she shimmed. The problem was she was loaded with sequence.

All the tables near the dance floor had a chance to win. We had a table right near the dance floor.

She started on the other side of the dance floor, and guys tried to hold onto her hips. There were lots of pain sounds coming from each of them when each tried.

She finally got to our table. I was pretty blotto by that time and I said I am going to try it.

She came up to me and started her shimmy. I put my hands on her hips and held on. I kept holding on until she stopped because she was tired.

My hands were bloody, but I had won. What did I win?? The DJ announced that I had won free drinks for the rest of the night.!! Just what I didn’t need.

I think I blacked out an hour or so later. I don’t remember getting back to our room.

+Both of these stores are in my upcoming book, Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.

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Time for bed check. How are you doing? Do you fear going to sleep because the dreams are too intense? Do you fear the 4th of July?

FEAR NOT!!

There are over 11,900 fellow veterans here who have your back.

BUT! If it is just too much for you right now, GET HELP!

Here is a toll free number you can call 24/7.

There are highly qualified counselors there to help you. They will not hang up until they know you are OK.

Never face the storms alone!

1-800-273-8255 Option # 1

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Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never, ever, give up!

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Basic Training in The Military Can be Interesting and Quite a Rude Awakening

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I have had a drastic drop in subscribers recently. From 2-24-21 to 3-1-21 I have only had 7 new subscribers, when I averaged over 20 a day.

Am I doing something wrong? Are you not happy with something I am writing? Please let me know. The whole purpose of this site is to reach out to my fellow veterans and give them hope.

Please make comments in the comment area below.

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I am going to share some more excerpts from my upcoming book, Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of life. with you today. They are from different parts of my military career.

In Basic Training, back in my day, we still had draftees. we had two in my platoon. They were not happy campers. The rest of us who enlisted finally told them to shut up and serve.

One of the draftees wouldn’t stop. He was a Native American. He was a good sized drink of water. Looked kind of like a linebacker.

The drill sergeant finally had enough of his whining and told him to straighten up and serve his country proudly. The Native American told him where to go.

The drill sergeant then told him to come into his room at the end of the barracks. It was pretty quiet for a while, and then all hell broke loose from that room. You could hear crashing of things, grunts of pain; cursing, and screaming.

Then it got very quiet again. We all figured that our drill sergeant had been beaten up, because he was 5’9′ and couldn’t have weighed more than 150 pounds. The Native American was 6 foot tall and around 200 pounds.

The door slowly came open and out staggered our drill sergeant. He looked like he had hit by a truck, but he was still standing. We all rushed to look in his room and there was the Native American out cold on the floor.

We had nothing but respect for our drill sergeant after that. Even the native american respected him.

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While I was deployed to South Korea, they gave us a thing called R&R. (Rest and recuperation.)

It was a week of going to Tokyo, Japan. All paid with free room and board. My very first vacation.

A buddy and I got there and settled down. The next day we went touring the area. We saw Japanese flower gardens. Pagodas, and lots of shopping areas. We were awestruck. Nothing like this back in the states!

Later in the week, we decided to venture into a bar that could be considered a disco bar later on in the states. We sat down and had a couple of beers.

Then an announcer who spoke English came on and announced that there was a belly dancer coming out to dance for us.

He went on to say that they were having a contest. The contest was to see who could hold onto the belly dancer’s hips the longest while she shimmied.

The dancer came out. She was beautiful and a caucasian girl. She started dancing around the circle of tables. At each table she would stop and invite a soldier to try to hold on to her. There were many who tried, but none that could hold on very long.

Then she came to my table. I had way too much the drink by that time and accepted the challenge. I put my hands on her hips and she began to shimmy. I kept a hold of her until she had to stop to rest.

I had won the contest. Then the announcer said what the prize was. YOU GET FREE DRINKS FOR THE REST OF THE EVENING!

Just what I didn’t need!! I also looked at my hands and they were full of blisters. The pain was setting in. What did I do about it? Had several more beers. I do not recall the rest of the evening. My buddy must have gotten me back to our hotel.

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More excerpts coming in my next post.

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How are things going for you.

Was your basic training interesting, or a nightmare?

Did you have time off when you were deployed, or did you sleep in a trench?

Some good things and some very bad things right?

Fear not!

There are ver 11,580 fellow veterans here who have your back.

BUT! If you can not cope with our world today, GET HELP!

Here is a toll free number to call 24/7.

There are highly qualified counselors there to help you. They will not hang up until they know you are OK.

Never, ever, take on this world alone.

1-800-272-8255 Option # 1

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Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never, ever, give up!

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+If you like what you see, please subscribe at the top of this page where it says, “subscribe.” When you do, all future posts will come directly to your inbox. Also, if you know some else who could benefit from this site, please let them know about it.