WWII Veteran Falls Out of His Bunk, and Ends Up in 20 Different Hospitals

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Military news…

Combat death puts spotlight on Americans fighting in Ukraine

An undetermined number of Americans — many with military backgrounds — are thought to be in the country battling Russian forces beside both Ukrainians and volunteers from other countries even though U.S. forces aren’t directly involved in fighting aside from sending military materiel, humanitarian aid and money.

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Germany: Quitting Russian oil imports by late summer is ‘realistic’

Germany says it is making progress on weaning itself off Russian fossil fuels and expects to be fully independent of Russian crude oil imports by late summer.

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Some civilians evacuated from Mariupol steel plant

Some women and children were evacuated from a steel plant that is the last defensive stronghold in the bombed-out ruins of the port city of Mariupol, a Ukrainian official and Russian state news organizations said, but hundreds are believed to remain trapped with little food, water or medicine.

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Rep. Kinzinger introduces measure to allow US military intervention if Russia uses chemical weapons

Speaking on CBS’ “Face the Nation,” the Illinois Republican said the joint resolution would not be a mandate for the Democratic president but rather a measure that would provide an option for Biden’s administration while also sending a warning to Russian President Vladimir Putin as he pursues war with Ukraine.

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Hacking Russia was off-limits, but the Ukraine war made it a free-for-all

Experts anticipated a Moscow-led cyber assault; instead unprecedented attacks by hacktivists and criminals have wreaked havoc in Russia.

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US weapons stockpiles will not be depleted to dangerous levels for Ukraine war, military officials tell senators
Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin told a subpanel of the Senate Appropriations Committee that the Pentagon is closely watching its inventories and working with the defense industry to replenish weapons such as Javelin and Stinger missiles as soon as possible.

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Army’s Gen. Cavoli nominated to lead US and NATO forces in Europe

Gen. Christopher G. Cavoli, who has led U.S. Army Europe and Africa for the past four years, will replace U.S. Air Force Gen. Tod Wolters, if confirmed.

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Here is an interview with a WWII veteran who was in 20 different hospitals.

My interview is with George Woodruff. We had become good friends. He is a WWII and Korean veteran. He is an American hero. Not because of what he did while in the military, but what he has done for his fellow veterans.

He is allowing me to share his name.

George Woodruff is a full time resident at Trinka Davis. Way back in his early military career he fell out of a top three tiered bunk and landed on his head. That would be the beginning of years of hospital times and many trips to the ER.

SOH

George, I want to thank you for taking the time to visit with me today. I am honored to be talking to you. Tell me about your early time in the military. When did you enlist?

George

August 8th, 1944.

SOH

Where did you do your Boot camp?

George

I did my boot camp at camp Downes, Great Lake Lakes Naval Training Center.

SOH

How was boot camp?

George

It was not Picnic! March… march… march, until you thought your legs would fall off. Then we had to wear a gas mask; enter a large chamber where you had to remove your gas mask. Tears ran down my face!

Boot camp was tough, but you learned to follow orders that might keep you alive when the actual shooting started. We became men during boot camp.

SOH

Where did you go after boot camp?

George

I was assigned to Basic Engineering School. I was temporarily transferred to the Replacement Depot. It had triple decker bunks there. I figured this was an accident waiting to happen since I was assigned the top bunk. They had no railings back then. And of course it did happen. I woke up one morning finding myself lying face down on the concrete floor. My nose was broken. I went to the aid station and the medical corpsman straightened up my nose.

I had no idea how serious my injuries from the fall actually were. I was to find this out the hard way over the many years as problems caused by the fall worsened.

I was in Army Hospitals 7 times during my service. Three of these were in Germany during the Berlin Airlift. I was in Navy Hospitals twice, once at Great Lakes for Scarlet Fever and once at Oakland Naval Hospital.
Since getting out of service I have been in VA Hospitals more than 20 times over the years.

SOH

Were there any incidents that stood out during your training?

George

We had a slightly overweight sailor who as not too clean. He bathed rarely. We finally grabbed him and took him to the shower. We used a stiff brush and soap and scrubbed him until his skin was red. From that day on that sailor was the cleanest guy in the barracks.

SOH

Tell me more on how your fall affected you as you went along in the service.

George

It was during the training period that problems from my fall began to manifest themselves. I would have periods of extreme irritability and occasional memory loss.

SOH

Did the fall cause you problems in your daily duties?

George

Yes, one day I was driving a forklift and blacked out. I went over the edge of a wall and crashed down onto a large diesel engine a few feet below. I was sent to Oakland Naval Hospital for evaluation and treatment. While I was in the hospital, Japan agreed to surrender on August 14th, 1945. Atom bombs had been dropped on Hiroshima, and Nagasaki.

SOH

What happened to you after your hospital visit?

George

I was honorably discharged on September 29th, 1945. I was awarded a 100% disability.

SOH

I see you were also in the Army, how did that happen?

George

I met a Sergeant in Houston who happened to be a recruiter. He invited me to his office, and he had a small bar. We had a few beers. I took some tests he asked me to take. We have several more beers. When I woke up the next morning, I was on a train to Ft. Ord, California! I had somehow joined the Army in 1947! (I did my basic at Ft. Ord, Just like George did. We have a lot in common.)

SOH

George went on to be trained at the Vent Hill Farms Station near Warrenton, Virginia. He was training for the Army Security Agency. (I too was trained to be an ASA trooper.) They trained people to do be radio intercept operators, cryptologist, and radio repair technicians.

SOH

I notice you spent much of your time at many different hospitals. That must have been tough.

George

I was in VA hospitals over seven times during my military days and over twenty times so far after I was discharged.

SOH

Let’s talk about now. One of the things you really had a hard time with was being separated from your wife Jeannie. Share your thoughts on that.

(Jeannie began to have memory loss and needed to be sent to a special facility that cares for those problems, and George had to be in a VA facility because of his problems. They had to live in separate places.)

“When Jeanne and I could no longer live together I felt like my world had ended. After so many years of a wonderful marriage we were torn apart by our failing health. It broke my heart and took away my reason for living.”
 
(This is an actual quote from George in an email to me.)
 
SOH
George now lives at the Trinka Davis Assisted Living Facility, in Corrollton, Georgia. This is a VA facility for military only. It was started by the good graces by Trinka Davis, who donated millions to get it started. 
 
SOH
 
George is now on hospice care, and has many ailments including congestive heart failure, diabetes, hearing loss, stenosis of the spine, problems still from his head injury, and many other ailments. He still has a very positive attitude. He has been an inspiration to me, and I will never forget him. He is a true American hero.
 
 
·        
 
In honor of my good friend George Woodruff, I am going share a poem he wrote in February of 2014. He told me he was extremely depressed when he wrote this poem, because he knew he would be separated from his wife Jeannie soon. 
 
Saga of a Disabled World War II Veteran
 
Time has passed me by and now I’m sick and old, nearly blind, kidneys failing, stenosis crippling my spine.
 
A pair of painful legs that no longer function or hold me up, a power wheelchair for this worn out old carcass of mine. 
 
So I guess I’ll bear this continual depression and pain. 
 
Until the Supreme Architect above finally takes me away. So God if you are up there somewhere listening to my prayer,
 
I would really appreciate it if you decide to do it today!
 
George Woodruff

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There will be more interviews in future posts. My next one will be with a Vietnam veteran. He has some very scary situations he had to go through. Keep coming back to see more. Better yet…God tot he top of this page and click on Subscribe. When you do all future posts will come directly to your inbox.

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Checking in on you. How are you doing? Is everything going OK, or are you struggling?

FEAR NOT!

There are over 14,572 veterans on this site who have your back.

Here is what I am asking you to do…please share this site with as many other veterans as you can. It has helped so many.

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If you are battling mentally, but you are losing, GET HELP!!

Here is a toll free number that you can call 24/7. There are highly qualified counselors there to help you, and they will not hang up until they know you are OK.

1-800-273-8255…texting 838255.

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Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never, ever, give up!

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+If you like what you see, please subscribe at the top of this page where it says, “subscribe.” When you do, all future posts will come directly to your inbox. Also, if you know some else who could benefit from this site, please let them know.

Take This Job and Love it! Some of the Duties in the Military Weren’t Fun.

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Military news…

Guard, Reserve Would Get 20 More C-130J Transport Aircraft Under Budget Deal

The Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard are slated to get funding for 20 more C-130J Super Hercules aircraft to replace aging airframes, according to the proposed budget bill that would fund the U.S. government for the rest of the fiscal year.

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After More Than Two Weeks of War, The Russian Military Grinds Forward at a Heavy Cost

Two weeks after Russian forces moved into Ukraine, there’s growing evidence that the invasion has not gone to plan—and that Russia’s military may be struggling to deploy a force capable of quickly defeating a numerically and technologically inferior adversary.

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‘We are disposable’ — Sexual assault survivor blasts Air Force after convicted offender allowed to retire


“You just showed every predator in the DoD that it is honorable to sexually harass and assault Airmen.”

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Why the skies over Ukraine have proven so deadly for Russian pilots

“The VKS is simply never meant to fight the way Western air forces do.”

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The Pentagon is saying diddly squat about what thousands of extra US troops are doing in Europe


“It’s kind of stupid that we can’t just be honest about what we’re doing.”

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Alwyn Cashe, Audie Murphy, Mary Walker among choices to replace bases named after Confederates


The list includes the names of 87 Americans who served bravely and honorably.

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Here is another chapter from my upcoming book, Signs of Hope for the military: In and Out of the trenches of Life.

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Take This Job and Love It

I went out to get the mail today and the mailman was still there sorting out his mail for the next stop. I asked him, “How are you doing?”

“I’m doing fine, but all this work I have to do now is wearing me down.”

My immediate response was that he should be glad he had a job no matter how tiresome it is. He wasn’t too excited that I said that, so I exited left and went back into the house.

I’m sure there are many people today who would love to have a job of any kind. When I was growing up, I had to make money to help support my mother, my brother, and myself. All three of us had to do some kind of job to make ends meet since my mom was divorced and was a single parent.

That was in the 1940s by the way. Times were tough at best, and we each found work to help out. They weren’t glamorous jobs in the least, but with each of us contributing, we were able to survive through the tough years. 

When you leave the military, times may be tough for a while as well. It is a shock to have a pretty good job for three years or more and then walk out into the private sector.

There are many resources in the back of this book to help you find work. It will also give you information on how to find babysitters and other practical help.

Don’t give up if there isn’t an instant job waiting for you when you separate from the military. Job hunting takes time. Job hunting is not on my list of fun things to do, and I am sure it isn’t for you either.

One thing you may have to agree to do is to accept just about any job you can at first. There are many low-level jobs that can lead to much better jobs in the same company if you stay with them and prove you are capable of much more. Yes, having to wear a nametag and taking hamburger orders may be a little degrading for a short time, but it is putting food on the table.

With the minimum wage increasing on a regular basis, a person can now almost make it on a fast-food type job.

You’re probably saying to yourself, Are you kidding me? I will not stoop so low as to take hamburger orders!”

I hear you loud and clear, but there are times when we just need to fight through the storms of life and take on things you may not want to take on. One is working wherever you can to support yourself and your family.

When I got out of the military I was very nervous. I had a family. (My first son was born four months after I got out.) I realized I had to support my family. I was still only about 22 years old, and this was the first time I knew I had to produce quickly on this planet called earth. I was going to college at the time and playing football for George Fox College. We were allowed to live on campus in some apartments. There was tuition to pay and food to put on the table. I knew I had to find a job fast.

The job I found was on a railroad “chain” gang. I call it a chain gang, because I was treated pretty roughly.

When I went to the administration office to ask about job openings, they said they only knew of one, but nobody wanted it. It was a job working on the railroad crew at the local pulp and paper company. I didn’t know why nobody wanted the job, but I grabbed it anyway. I started to work the next Monday.

When I got there, I was told to go out to the railroad tracks and the crew boss would be there. I went there and saw about six guys working on the tracks. It looked interesting since they were replacing old rails with new ones.

I walked up to who I thought was the boss and introduced myself. He said, “Boy, I’m glad to see you. My men have had to do some tough work because there weren’t enough men.”

The shift boss was a person who didn’t like the college kids coming in and taking jobs away from others, so he let us know about it by pouring on the hard labor.

He told me to get a sledgehammer. I had no idea what he meant, but one of the guys quickly pointed it out to me. It looked very heavy and I was right. It took some effort to even pick it up.

This type of sledgehammer was made specifically for driving rail spikes. They often weigh 20 pounds and have curved heads with the peak only being about one inch across. The length of the handle can vary and be more than three feet long. The target sweet spot was not much bigger than a dime. So you had to be accurate or you would be hitting the rails themselves, which damages them.

I slowly got the hang of it and was driving spikes into the ground. On my first break. I took my gloves off and saw the blisters starting to form. One of the crewmen saw the blisters and said, “Welcome to the chain gang.” I asked him what that meant. He told me that prisoners, who were chained together, had to do the same job at many of the prisons around the country. That didn’t make me feel any better.

So I went to work every day and was a grunt along with another college student. We did all the dirty work because the rest of the crew were full-time workers who had been there for years. We were the ones who had to pound the spikes in the track. We were the ones who had to carry replacement rails to the right spot.

The other guy quit after a couple of weeks, but I was determined to slug it out with the chain boss and not let him force me to quit as well. He kept piling heavy work on me. I went home with bloody blisters on my hands even though I wore gloves. I made it through that summer with a smile and messed-up hands, but I didn’t allow anyone to take that job away from me, because of the need to provide for my family.

Later the boss ended up liking me for my toughness. He even started giving me some not-so-tough jobs and asked me to come back the next summer. I didn’t make it because I had a car accident and couldn’t drive to school. I had to drop out.

If you are already out in the private sector, find yourself a job that will provide for your family and love that job. It isn’t your lifelong job, but it is a job.

If you’re still in the military, start taking any and all classes you can at night through the online colleges. The more education you have when you get out, the better job you will get. Your training in the military should help you a great deal as well.

Stay strong and know that you will find work. You will provide for yourself and your family. It just takes time and perseverance.

IWILL

I can tell you many stories where I was tested, like during basic training, where I had to dig a hole and bury a cigarette butt, only to have the sergeant yell at me to dig it up again. He did this three times. I did it all three times without a complaint. (I didn’t even smoke!)

After I was done the sergeant told me, “Good job, soldier!” It was just a test. He later recommended me for soldier of the month and placed me on the honors marching team for Ft. Ord. All because I stood my ground and wouldn’t let him break me down.

One of the worst things we can do as new people in the private sector is to get angry and depressed because we don’t find that dream job right away. Search the appendix in the back of this book. Many sites have job opportunities, schooling, and training.

You also need to remember that God has plans for you that are higher than you ever dreamed you could achieve. Just stay with Him and let Him guide you down the right path.

Think about this

Isn’t it funny we often find that perfect job the day after we were about to give up?

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There will be more excerpts in the future, so keep coming back. Better yet…go to the top of this page and click on subscribe. When you do all future posts will go directly to your inbox.

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Checking in on you. How are you doing? Did you have problems with some of the duties forced on you in the military?

FEAR NOT!

There are over 14,140 veterans on this site who have your back.

Here is what I am asking you to do…please share this site with as many other veterans as you can. It has helped so many.

______________________________________________________________

If you are battling mentally, but you are losing, GET HELP!!

Here is a toll free number that you can call 24/7. There are highly qualified counselors there to help you, and they will no hang up until they know you are OK.

1-800-273-8255…texting 838255

______________________________________________________________

Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never, ever, give up!

_______________________________________________________________

+If you like what you see, please subscribe at the top of this page where it says, “subscribe.” When you do, all future posts will come directly to your inbox. Also, if you know some else who could benefit from this site, please let them know.

Five Reasons Why I Joined the Military

+If you like what you see, please subscribe at the top of this page where it says, “subscribe.” When you do, all future posts will come directly to your inbox. Also, if you know some else who could benefit from this site, please let them know.

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Military news…

16 years after pulling his soldiers out of a burning Bradley Fighting Vehicle, Sgt. 1st Class Alwyn Cashe will be posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor.

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The Air Force relieved an officer of command who served separation paperwork to an airman in a mental health clinic for treatment after a suicide attempt.

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The Navy SEAL who died on Tuesday after sustaining injuries during training over the weekend was also a father, a football coach, a 2001 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, and the commander of SEAL Team 8.

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In a heartbreaking moment on Monday, a lone military spouse stood before senior Navy leaders and demanded honesty regarding the water contamination at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii.

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Former Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard, an Army Reserve lieutenant colonel, may have once again broken military rules on political activities by making a video in which she wore her military uniform while accusing “self-serving politicians” and others of wanting to start World War III.

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‘Dec. 7, 1941, changed our lives’: Scores of WWII vets venture to Pearl Harbor on attack’s 80th anniversary

More than 2,300 people died in the surprise attack, during which Japanese planes struck all military bases on Oahu, prompting America’s entrance into World War II.

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‘The water was on fire’: 100-year-old Illinois native survived Pearl Harbor, one of few left alive.

Sterling Cale, who turned 100 recently, is one few remaining survivors of attack. At the 80th anniversary of the bombing, it’s worth recalling his story and honor his urging to keep alive the legacy of Pearl Harbor.

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Some thoughts on why I enlisted into the Army.

  1. I had been struggling in college, because I wanted to have a good time and not study. I met with two buddies and we decided to enlist under the buddy program.
  2. We were together during basic training, but separated during MOS training.
  3. I had my basic training at FT. Ord, Cal. My next stop was Ft. Devens Mass, and then it was off to Ft. Gordon, GA. There I got my radio/teletype operator training.
  4. Then I was deployed to South Korea. After that I was sent to FT. Bragg NC.
  5. The experiences was amazing for me. I had never left my home state before joining, and then I was sent all over the United States, and to foreign countries. I grew up a lot, and gained much confidence.

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I have done a little more on my book. It is close to being finished. When it is, a publishing company is ready to print my book. Come back often to see the progress. Better yet…go to the top of this page and click on “Subscribe.” When you do, all future posts will come directly to your inbox.

Checking in on you my friend. How are you doing? Do you have dreams about your service time? Are they nightmares?

FEAR NOT!

There are over 13,445 fellow veterans subscribed to this site who have your back.

If the dreams just too much for you right now, GET HELP!

Here is a toll free number to call 24/7. There are highly qualified counselors there to help you, and they will not hang up until the know you are OK.

1-800-272-8255..texting 838255.

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+If you like what you see, please subscribe at the top of this page where it says, “subscribe.” When you do, all future posts will come directly to your inbox. Also, if you know some else who could benefit from this site, please let them know.