Military Personnel Must Stay at Their Posts no Matter What

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What a ride I have been on. I had surgery on my left eye on Monday, and it is healing quite well. Still hard to type, but I will not leave my post. I will share a story from my upcoming book, Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life. I was injured, but stayed on my duty spot.

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One of the things that happened to day which is Veteran’s Day, is nothing. I had to head to the coast and they didn’t have any restaurants on the list I gave you a couple of posts ago.

I went to the very small town of Waldport, Oregon. It is right on the coast. It is actually a pretty cool town.

I was there to get a haircut at the salon where my wife always goes, because a close friend is running it. We drive 70 miles each way to get our hair done.

As I was getting my haircut, the barber told me to look across the street. In this small little town the people were gathering to honor our veterans. You could see all the American Legion hats being worn. She said they have been there for a couple of hours. They had speakers, and some music. I so wanted to go there and greet them, but it was over when my haircut was done.

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I said I would share an excerpt from the book, Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life. This excerpt is from my time deployed to Korea. I was a radio/teletype (053) operator, and spent each of my days up on hill 468. On top of that hill was a small military outpost. It was being used to monitor the airwaves for breaches of security.

I was highly trained for that site since I was chosen to be a part of the Army Security Agency. It was something like the CIA of the military.

One day I was monitoring he airwaves when every started stopping. The machines all began to turn off.

I rushed outside to see that the main generator was out of gas. The previous solider was suppose to make sure it was full before he left.

I got two cans of gas and climbed up on the generator. I had just finished filling the tank when I started to fall. I grabbed for something to help me not get too hurt. Unfortunately it was the manifold for the generator. It was extremely hot and it burnt my left hand seriously.

I was in severe pain.

I could have called down to headquarters and have them send up the next shift, but that would wake them up with only a few hours of sleep.

I decided I need to remain at my post and tough it out. I found some Vaseline and wrapped my left hand with a medical cloth.

I was one handed and had to work the the equipment the best I could.

Luckily I only had a few hours left on my shift.

This was a time where I learned about not leaving your post no matter what. Many of heroes have done that on the front lines to save many of their buddies. I certainly was not a hero in this case, but I did my appointed task and I am very proud of that.

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Time to check in on you my friend. How are you doing? Is the life we have to live right now starting to get to you? Does the news cause you to scream like it does me? You certainly are not alone.

We just past 10,000 veterans following this site. (10,040.) Everyone of us has your back.

However, if it is just too overwhelming right now, GET HELP! Here is a toll free number to call, 24/7. There are highly qualified counselors there to help you. They will not hang up until the know you are OK. It is free BTW.

1-800-273-8255 Option # 1

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Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never fosaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never, ever, give up!

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+If you like what you see, please subscribe at the top of this page where it says, “subscribe.” When you do, all future posts will come directly to your inbox. Also, if you know some else who could benefit for the site, please let them know about it. I want to reach out to as many veterans as possible.

Losing a Buddy in the Military is Hard at Best

+If you like what you see, please subscribe at the top of this page where it says, “subscribe.” When you do all future posts will come directly to your inbox. Also, if you know some else who could benefit for the site, please let them know about it. You may be saving a life. Your comments will not be seen by other people, just me, and I will connect with you to see if you are OK to share it.

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I have been reading about all the upgrading the military is doing in all the different branches. In my opinion, we control the skies.

Why is it happening right now.?It is because President Trump has allocated much more money for the military, and this allows them to more testing and upgrading. I cannot see how anyone could say that Trump doesn’t like the military.

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I lost a dear friend recently who was a military buddy. We were very close. We connected almost everyday on RallyPoint, a Military social network. It was so sudden we all were stunned. Losing a comrade like that is very hard to handle.

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Have you lost a military buddy?

I know exactly what you went, or are going through. It is like losing a brother or sister. They were closer than many family memebers when you served with them.

This is a problem for many veterans who battle PTSD because of the loss.

They replay the loss over and over again in their heads. They can’t shake it. It haunts them even when they try to sleep.

I said I lost a buudy I knew through RallyPoint, but I also lost buddies I served with while I was deployed to Korea. When I enlisted I did it under the buddy system. Two other high school buddies and I enlsited the same day hoping we would be stationed together. It worked out fine. We were in basic training together, and we all got deployed to Korea.

This is when the story gets very sad. One of my buddies didn’t make it home. He died in Korea. It was a strange unknown death in many ways. All They could tell us is that he caught a virus of some kind. I think of him often.

While in Korea I made some close friends. Many of my company did things together. We were a “team.” When one suffered we all suffered. When one was glad we were all glad.

One of those very close buddies of mine got too very drunk one night and when he staggered back the the camp from the villiage, he fell into a “Honey Bucket.” This is a hole in the ground that the people filled with human waste to fertilize their rice.

He fell into one and sufficated. I was numb for a couple of weeks. So was the rest of the team. No one were talking to each other. Just do your job, and head to your qounset hut. (Barricks)

So I have been there with you. I lost three buddies. I am blessed that I didn’t aquire PTSD, but I was severly depressed when i got nack to the states. So much so, I was ready to end my life in 2001. I didn’t, and I am here crying in my beer.

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So now that I totally depressed you, How are you doing? Have you lost a buddy? Has it changed your life? Please do not let this happen. Seek some help if you are feeling this way. Below is a toll free number you can call 24/7. If you are the end of your rope, GET HELP!!

1-800-273-8255 Option # 1

There are highly qualified counselors there to help you. Tey will not hand up until they know you are OK.

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+If you like what you see, please subscribe at the top of this page where it says, “subscribe.” When you do all future posts will come directly to your inbox. Also, if you know some else who could benefit for the site, please let them know about it. You may be saving a life. Your comments will not be seen by other people, just me, and I will connect with you to see if you are OK to share it.

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Remember:


You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never, ever, give up!

This Pandemic is causing Havoc with Our Veterans

Since I last posted we have had 36 new subscribers. Welcome to all of you. We are now averaging over 15 new subscribers a day. I am proud to be your blogger, that wants the very best for each of you as veterans, or family members of veterans.

It has been a nightmare for those who are locked up and not able to get out to do things because of the virus. My State of Oregon is getting hit hard. The county I live in is a red hot spot for the virus. Second highest in the state.

As a veteran, who has underlining problems with my health, I have no choice. My wife and I go on walks. We get in our car and drive to no where just to get out. We do our grocery shopping online and go to the store, and they bring out what we ordered.

I fear that this Pandemic is causing havoc with those veterans who have their own battles of PTSD, TBI, Depression, Anxiety, etc. They are fighting their own, war only to have the enemy coming to their door.

Here are some suggestions to get your mind off of what is happening in the world.

  1. Do not turn the TV on and read. There are millions of great books at Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and many smaller book stores online, like Powell’s Books in Portland Oregon.
  2. Write! This is a wonderful way to get “away.” I wrote my first book,Signs of Hope: Ways to Survive in an Unfriendly World, just from some journals I had written, and it won a National Award from the Reader’s Favorite Awards. WRITE!
  3. Some have taken up art. You can draw or paint. I am not good at either, but you may have just what you need to relieve yourself of stress.
  4. Hand select movies on your TV that are uplifting and makes you laugh. We have a free movie section on our TV. I have watched a ton of them the last three months.
  5. Use Zoom, Skype, or any other connection, to talk to your buddies, or family. I have been doing this and it gives me hope and helps me smile.

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Seriously, how are YOU doing? Are you having a bad time adjusting to all this mess around us? Do you have times of depression, and anxiety? I know how you feel, because I have been there.

If it is getting far too overwhelming, get Help!

You are not a sissy for getting help. I know that some people thing that since we are veterans, that we should be able to handle anything. Total lie!

If you are hurting look for help. Here is a 24/7 toll free free number to get immediate help .

1-800-273-8255 (option # 1)

Just do it!!

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Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never, ever, give up!

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+If you feel this site is valuable and helpful for you, please subscribe. When you do all future posts will delivered directly to your inbox. Just go to the top of this page and click on “Subscribe.” It will guide you. Also, if you know of some veterans who are hurting or could benefit from this site please let them know about it.