It is Extremely Hard to Lose a Buddy in the Military

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What a horrible day we had on Wednesday of this week. I was ashamed to say I was an American when I sat and watched what was going on.

I am 100% against what happened.

They accomplished nothing, and it put a stain on our country.

This kind of terrorism has to stop and it has to stop now.

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I thought I would share a couple of excerpts from my up coming book, Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.

This is actually two stories of where I lost a buudy.

The first one is when three of us buddies decided to enlist in the military together. We were in basic together. We were in MOS training, and we were sent to Korea. Three of us together, but only two came back alive.

One of my friends came down with some local crude and died. No real answers there, but a huge loss to me.

The second buudy I lost was while I was deployed to Korea. One of the Signal Corp guys and became good friends. We worked together and played together.

One morning when we had formation, I noticed he was missing. The officer in charge announced that my buddy had “drowned,” in a honey bucket. A Honey Bucket is a spot where all the farmers bring their human waste to be used to fertilize the crops.

I found out later that my friend got seriously drunk and was staggering back to our camp in the dark. He stumbled into the honey bucket and suffocated. He did drown.

That broke my spirit for a long time. Two buddies gone in one year. ___________________________________

Have you lost a buddy? Does it still cause you pain? I hear you clearly!!

Don’t forget that there are 10,800 fellow veterans on this site who have been on the same boat. They have your back.

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If it come to you overwhelmed and lost, GET HELP!!

Here is a toll free number for you to call that is free. Even the counseling is free. There are highly qualified counselors there to help you. They will not hang up until they know you are OK

1-800-273-8255 Option 1

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Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all….never, ever, give up!

+If you like what you see, please subscribe at the top of this page where it says, “subscribe.” When you do, all future posts will come directly to your inbox. Also, if you know some else who could benefit from this site, please let them know about it.

Come On Man! Suck it Up!

Thanks to all of you who have been joining us here. The response has been wonderful.  We just past 3,716 new subscribers. That is a huge increase in 2016. We only had 1,000 two years ago. In 2017 help us to make it to 4,000. We are only 284 away of reaching our goal.  Help us make it by subscribing today if you haven’t already. This shows you care for veterans. Just click on the icon right after the title of this post to do that.

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Doug Bolton, the founder of the blog, Signs of Hope, which is at www.dailysignsofhope.com, has written a new book, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.” It will be reaching out the many military and veterans who may be battling anxiety, fear, depression, addictions, rejections, and the many other usual suspects. There are 22 military connected suicides every day. That is almost one every hour. Doug wants to help stop those statistics.  

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This is a new social network just for veterans. I joined it and made instant friendships with veterans who want to talk about what I want to talk about. Please check it out. You will be glad you did. 

www.rallypoint.com/join/spc-douglas-bolton

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Have you ever had someone on say to you, “Come on Man!.” Meaning that they may not believe what you are telling them.

It is a common phrase that I have heard from time to time.

Here are some facts about veterans that you may not believe either:

  • 22 veterans take their own lives every day. I didn’t say every year. I said every day. That is appalling! We need to find way to reach out to our brother and sisters from the military.
  • There are a total of 22 million veterans in all branches of service. 22 million men and women who are putting themselves in harm’s way so that you and I can live in a free country.
  • There are 4 million veterans disabled. Many have wounds that forces them into wheelchairs, assisted living facilities, and need permanent care every day.
  • This is the saddest statistic: There are 1/2 million veterans who are homeless and live on the streets. They fought for us, and now they are living day to day in the cold, damp, world as we know it, with only cardboard, or newspapers covering them.

COME ON MAN!!!

Yes, it is hard to believe this is happening in our own country, but it is the truth. These are not made up statistics. These aren’t there to make you ashamed, even though I am. They are there to try to wake all of us up and do something about it.

Those of you that may be suffering. Be strong! Let people help you. Don’t hide in your own self pity. I am a disabled veteran myself, and know the pain that you have to go through in life.

Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never, ever, give up!

More Military Veteran Interviews

Thanks to all of you who have been joining us here. The response has been wonderful.  We just past 3,300 new subscribers. That is a huge increase in 2015. We only had 1,000 a year ago. Help us to make it to 4,000.  Could you be the one that puts us over the top? Our goal for the end of this year is 6,000.

Help us continue to grow by subscribing today if you haven’t already. Just click on the icon right after the title of this post to do that.

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Doug Bolton, the founder of the blog, Signs of Hope, which is at www.dailysignsofhope.com, has written a new book, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.” It will be reaching out the many military and veterans who may be battling anxiety, fear, depression, addictions, rejections, and the many other usual suspects. There are 22 military connected suicides every day. That is almost one every hour. Doug wants to help stop those statistics. Doug sent off his mini proposal to an agent who is very interested in his concept. We will update you when we hear more. 

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On my last post below I started sharing a few of the interviews I am doing for my new book, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.”

This book is reaching out to all the veterans who may be suffering after or even during their time in the military. It covers PTSD, deployment, loneliness, depression, domestic violence, spouses left behind, etc. It even has some humor of when I was in the military.

Today I am going to share a couple more interviews. In the last post I said that I would only be sharing a little part of each interview. I will continue that here. To see the entire interviews you will need to get the book. (This is called a hook in the writing community.)

One interview I had was with a Vietnam veteran. It wasn’t planned interview. I happened to be at a fast food restaurant and saw him sitting alone staring out the window. I could tell he was a veteran by his Vietnam hat he had on.

He finally got up and I saw that he had a cane. He hobbled over to the trash bin and then started to leave.

I asked him if he would sit with me for a while. He hesitated until I told him I was a veteran as well. Here is the conversation we had. It really wasn’t an interview. I didn’t want it to sound that way.

Me- “What unit were you in?” Veteran-“I was on a ship off the coast of Vietnam, and we had a helicopter unit that went in to rescue soldiers, bring in supplies, and did humanitarian help for some of the starving people.” Me- “What was the worst moment you had in the military?” Veteran- “I saw my best friend and the rest of his crew take off in a helicopter and suddenly crash into the ocean. They never recovered the bodies because it was too deep.”

There was much more talked about, but this was the most heart breaking part.

Another interview I had was with a Vietnam medic. He had some horror stories which I won’t share here but will be in the book. Here are some highlights:

Me- “Was being a medic a tough job?” Veteran- “Of course it was. To see young men with their legs gone, or near their last breath was extremely hard.”  Me- “Did you have some special moments?” Veteran- “Yes, I was caring for a soldier who couldn’t have been much over eighteen. He asked me if I was scared. I said yes. That seemed to calm him down a lot knowing that someone felt the same way as he did, but was still trying to help him anyway.”

I will have many more interviews in the book, and the book will be full of hope, and showing veterans ways to cope in the world we have to live in after we hit the private sector.

A word to all veterans…

You are a special person. You went out of your way to serve you country. God loves as you are, warts and all. You are a hero to not only me, but many other people. Never be ashamed of what you did. Never feel your time was wasted. Never allow others to degrade you for what you have done for your country.

Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never, ever, give up!