A Sniper Shares His Hurts and Regrets

Today is Red Friday. We should all be wearing red to show support our active duty military.

I’ve had some amazing interviews with veterans while putting my new book, Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.

I interviewed WW ll, Korean, Vietnam Iraq, and Afghanistan soldiers.

Some of the interviews were funny; some were sad; and some were hard to listen to.

Today I will share one interview to show you some of the fear, disappointments and anger our veterans have gone through.

Interview with a Sniper

I talked to a veteran from El Paso, Texas. He was a Sargent First Class. His duties were being a sniper.

He was asked if it was hard to shot another person. His answer was, “Not since I was helping my buddies stay alive.”

Death of His Buddies

The next question I asked him was how many of his buddies were killed. He said,”Fifteen or sixteen.” I said, “That must have been hard on you.” He said, They were my friends, what can I say.”

It is Hard on Families

He was getting irritated, so I switched to his family. I asked him if he was married. He said, “I was, but I am divorced now.” I then asked, “Can you tell me why that happened? ” He said, “The separation was to hard on both of us. She went her own way because she was so lonely.” He also said he had three children that he only sees once and a while.

There is much more to this interview, but you can see that he had a very rough time while in the military.

Many other stories like this

I have many more interviews to share. Be sure to subscribe to make sure you do not miss one. Just go to the top and click on the subscribe icon. Then all further posts will go directly to your inbox.

Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never, ever, give up!

A Story of Sadness About a Wounded Warrior

It has been a while since my last post. I hope this is a start of many more post.

It has been sad to see how many of my fellow veterans are struggling. It breaks my heart when I hear their stories. I will share one here, and hope you will support him.

Sgt Michael Thorin was deployed to Afghanistan. He was a platoon leader of a escort unit protecting the caravans of vehicles traveling.

One day he was escorting a caravan, when the vehicle in front of him caught on fire for no reason. It burst into flames very quickly. Sgt Thorin jumped out of his rig and ran to try to save his men. They couldn’t get close, because of the heat of the flames. Two of his men burnt to death.

When I interviewed him this was the toughest part for him to talk about.

To be helpless and watch your men die has to be hard at best.

This is not the end of the story for Sgt Thorin. During his deployment he contracted some virus, or germ. This tore into his lungs. When he got out, he attempted to be a firefighter, and did well for a while. He had to stop working later because his lungs were closing down.

Today he is still alive, but needs a double lung transplant.

He is a very strong Christian, and he said that is what is keeping him going. He posts a lot on Facebook to share his love for the Lord. Go to Facebook and put in his name, Michael Thorin, and be blessed.

There are many more stories like this in my new book, Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.

What about you? Are you struggling? Please understand the you are not alone. There are over 7,000 followers of this blog and they are in the same boat with you.

Reach out by making a comment and we will support you 100%

Don’t let the dark side take over your life.

Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all….never, ever, give up!!

The many ways to avoid trauma, fear and Depression.

One of the hardest things for a veteran to overcome are the trials and tribulations of coming home and having to deal with their everyday lives. They fight depression.

They fought hard for our country, but the battles left them traumatized and depressed.. They couldn’t cope.

I have been doing some research, and found some ideas and thoughts to help ease the pain.

They one I love the most is being a beekeeper.

I go to have coffee every Tuesday and Thursday, and meet with twelve to thirteen other men and women. There are many stories there. Many different backgrounds. The one that was most interesting to me was that two of the men were beekeepers.

One was a veteran. He said he spends hours working the hives. By doing that it distracts him from his past worries. It has helped him defeat depression.

I got my first jar of honey the other day, and it tastes wonderful.

Another way to get away from the world is painting. Going to centers that teach you how to paint has helped many veterans. One has been working at it so long he has art shows to show off his work. He has lost his depression.

Yet another way to find peace is gardening. I know several veterans who are wonderful at gardening. One of them brings his veggies to coffee each time we meet. The tomatoes were wonderful. He also raises peppers, of many kinds; squash, beans, and much more. It makes him proud to be able to share, and have us be happy with his work. He feels so much better and has lost his depression.

Another idea I am not as familiar with is horseback riding. I read up on this and it is wonderful therapy for many veterans. They feed the horses, walk them, and ride them.

There are many other ways to “escape.” Ask your VA representative for more ways to thrive in your world.

______________________________________________________

Update on my upcoming book. “Signs of Hope for the MIlitary: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.”

I Am almost finished. I have a publisher, and they are ready to go. I am just finishing up some interviews with veterans. This has been the most rewarding part for me in this book. There will a section all by itself with many interviews, with WWII, Korean, Afghanistan, and Iraq veterans. They are too many of those interviews where there was sharing of losing friends, getting wounded, trauma for the wars themselves.

I am going to share one interview with you to show you what type of stories you will read if you get the book.

Ira Feldman was in WII and the Korean War. He was only 18 when he went in. He did his duty during WWII and was sent home. He started a new life, only to find out they had ordered him to come back in for the Korean War.

He was being shipped to Korea when he was in a huge hanger where they were loading planes. There were two planes. As he was waiting to hear his name for boarding he spotted an old friend from WWII. They met and got caught as fast up as they could.

Then Ira had to get back with his group. He was seeing that he was going to go on the first plane and his buddy was going on the second plane. He raised his hand and the sergeant barked at him. “What do you want?” Ira said, “I have a friend that is going to be on the second plane is there a way for me to switch?

The sergeant said, “Hell no!” Get back with the group. Ira them saw what looked like the commanding officer of the whole thing. He walked over to him and asked the same question, The Captain screamed at him, to leave him alone. Ira was persistent. The Captain finally yelled, “Go to the second plane and quite whining.”

Ira and his friend got on the second plane. They were very happy. The two planes took off and landed about half way for a refill. They took off from that spot and then the horrific news came over the speaker in his plane. “The first plane has crashed, and there is no one alive!”

I will leave you up in the air here. The complete interview will be in the book.

____________________________________________________________

If you are struggling and need help, please get that help. Here is one way to start getting some help.

(877-247-4645) Is available 24/7.

God bless you for your service!!

Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never ever give up.!