What is Life Like as a Sniper?

On Tuesday I wrote about one of my adventures while in the military. I will do that from time to time, but this site is for you. Today I will speak directly to you.

I assume many of you were deployed during your time in the military I was sent to South Korea. I had many adventures there which I will be sharing from time to time.

I came back a different person, like many of you, I am sure did too. I lost a buddy, and saw some things that will be hard to share. However, I will wait until later on.

Some of you may be battling PTSD, TMI, Depression, or war wounds. I feel your pain.

I would love it if you would share your story in the comment section. You do not need to share your name. Tell us your story so we can understand you more.

I have done many interviews of veterans for my book. I will share one of them with you knowing that there are many others that will be in the book.

A Sniper

I interview a veteran from Texas. I got to know him through RallyPoint. This is a social network for only veterans. I highly recommend it. You will find many fellow veterans who are the same boat with you.

The veteran from Texas was a sniper in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Here is the exchange:

I was honored to be able interview a veteran who was an Afghanistan/Iraq veteran.

Here is the rough draft for the book:

SOH

What did you do while you were in the Army?

William I was a sniper.

SOH

You are in El Paso. It can be very cold there.

William

Yes it can.

SOH

So, do you have family?

William

I am divorced, but I have three children.

SOH

When did you go into the service?

William

Right out of High school. I was seventeen.

SOH

You mentioned that you had a couple of buddies that were killed?

William

Actually, twelve of my buddies were killed.

SOH

How were you able to handle that?

William

You don’t allow yourself to think about it

SOH

Were you very close to any of them?

William

I was close to all of them.

SOH

I had close friends in Korea as well.

SOH

Why did you enlist in the first place?

William

It is a family tradition. My Brothers and my grandfather enlisted. I was honored to serve my country.

SOH

Interesting, I also had a family tradition. My three uncles served in WWII. My brother and I Served, and my son just retired as a Colonel from the Army.

SOH

If you could would you go back in again?

William

Oh ya!! I wouldn’t change anything. 22 years

SOH

If there was one thing you could change about the Army, what would that be?

William

I would spend more time with family. My job came first back then.

SOH

What would be your advice to soldiers who are struggling?

William

Don’t give up. If you are deployed, or getting ready to be deployed you don’t think about it. 

SOH

Do you have PTSD?

William

Yes, and because of this I recommend that it be mandatory to get counseling when you are discharged from the military.

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This is an on going interview. I want to get back to him and ask more specifc questions about being a sniper.

What does it feel like to kill someone?

What did you think of when you have an enemy in the cross hairs?

Did you ever regret shooting someone?

There will be many other questions. Stay tuned as I get more information.

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If you are struggling get help. It is not something to be ashamed of if you need help. Got to get the tough military guy/girl out of your head and find help.

*If you like what you are reading just go to the top of this page and click on subscribe. Wen you do you will get each future post directly to your inbox. Please let other veterans know about this site. It may help them as well.

Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And…never, ever, give up!

The Pandemic is bad, but Memories Help us

It has been a long few weeks around here. Being in a lock down is because of the Pandemic, not fun. I am climbing the walls, and want the freedom to do what I want in life. Of course, that is not possible, and we should obey the rules for the sake of others.

When I was in basic training, I had some interesting times. Let me share one of them:

We were done at the firing range one day, and our platoon leader had something he had to do so he asked a Warrant Officer to march us back to the barracks.

A few of us realized that this Officer had no idea on how to lead a group in a march. So before he brought us to attention we whispered among us that we were going to follow his commands only if the were Army commands.

He told us to start marching. We froze. He ordered us to start marching. Still no movement. Finally another platoon leader came over to help him, by saying, “Company attention! Forward march! ” We started marching. We were going along OK until he saw that we were marching towards a boat ramp. He yelled, “Stop!” We kept marching. He screamed, “Stop now.” We kept marching. The front of the group was starting into the water! The frustrated officer finally screamed for help, and a Army soldier came over and yelled, “Company Halt!” We stopped, and then he yelled, “About face.'” We turned the other way, and he said “Forward march.!” By this time there were many of the platoon swimming in the water, laughing their heads off. We decided that was enough torture for the officer, and obeyed all of his commands after that.

The next morning when we were in formation, the company commander came out and scolded us for our adventure, and started laughing on his way back to his office.

I have many other stories like this in my up coming book called, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of life.” I am almost finished. I will keep you posted.

Have you been deployed, and had a bad experience. Did you get PTSD, TMI, Depression, etc.

You are not alone. Be strong, and know that many veterans read this blog, and are in the same boat with you. Just tell us about it and we have your six. Use the comment section below to do that. No need to say your name.

This blog has about 8,000 followers. That is because veterans can come here and find hope.

If you like what you see, please subscribe, by clicking on the icon at the top of this page. When you do you will receive any future posts right in your inbox. Please let other veterans know about this site who you think may benefit from it.

Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all….never, ever, give up!