Never Give Up If you are Trying to Get Disability Compensation From the Military

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Military news…

Airman awarded for role in base defense during deadly 2020 attack in Kenya
“We have quick reaction checklists on paper … but there’s really no time to pull out those checklists.”

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Inside the agency working to bring every missing US service member home
“The goal is for us to go out of business.”

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Why the Army wants to leave a stash of weapon systems behind on a Japanese island
The Army wants to bolster Japan against Chinese aggression, but it also doesn’t want to constantly redeploy weapon systems.

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Army plans to ‘nearly triple’ production of artillery shells after US gives nearly 1 million to Ukraine
When it comes to shells and rockets, it’s always good to buy in bulk.

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It has been hard to be positive when I have been turned down so many times trying to get disability benefits. I have been trying for years.

I have two applications going:

  1. I lost some hearing being a radio operator while deployed to Korea. The doctor that did my discharge physical didn’t even test my ears during his testing.
  2. I was in a jeep accident while stationed at Ft. Bragg. I was thrown from the jeep on top of a big boulder. I hit it back first. My head was thrown back and I got a whip lash, plus it knocked me unconscious. The same doctor did not take x-rays of my back.

I haven’t given up! Never give up, if you know you deserve compensation.

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Checking in on you. How are you doing? Is everything going OK, or are you fighting back memories?

FEAR NOT!

There are over 15,219 Veterans on this site who have your back.

If you are battling mentally, but you are losing, GET HELP!!

Here is a toll free number that you can call 24/7. There are highly qualified counselors there to help you, and they will not hang up until they know you are OK.
1-800-273-8255…texting 838255.

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Remember:


You are never alone.


You are never forsaken.


You are never unloved.


And above all…never, ever, give up.

+Now there is an easier way to get help. Just dial 988, and you will have help ready for you.

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+If you like what you see, please subscribe at the top of this page where it says, “subscribe.” When you do, all future posts will come directly to your inbox. Also, if you know some else who could benefit from this site, please let them know.

WWII Veteran Falls Out of His Bunk, and Ends Up in 20 Different Hospitals

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Military news…

Combat death puts spotlight on Americans fighting in Ukraine

An undetermined number of Americans — many with military backgrounds — are thought to be in the country battling Russian forces beside both Ukrainians and volunteers from other countries even though U.S. forces aren’t directly involved in fighting aside from sending military materiel, humanitarian aid and money.

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Germany: Quitting Russian oil imports by late summer is ‘realistic’

Germany says it is making progress on weaning itself off Russian fossil fuels and expects to be fully independent of Russian crude oil imports by late summer.

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Some civilians evacuated from Mariupol steel plant

Some women and children were evacuated from a steel plant that is the last defensive stronghold in the bombed-out ruins of the port city of Mariupol, a Ukrainian official and Russian state news organizations said, but hundreds are believed to remain trapped with little food, water or medicine.

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Rep. Kinzinger introduces measure to allow US military intervention if Russia uses chemical weapons

Speaking on CBS’ “Face the Nation,” the Illinois Republican said the joint resolution would not be a mandate for the Democratic president but rather a measure that would provide an option for Biden’s administration while also sending a warning to Russian President Vladimir Putin as he pursues war with Ukraine.

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Hacking Russia was off-limits, but the Ukraine war made it a free-for-all

Experts anticipated a Moscow-led cyber assault; instead unprecedented attacks by hacktivists and criminals have wreaked havoc in Russia.

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US weapons stockpiles will not be depleted to dangerous levels for Ukraine war, military officials tell senators
Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin told a subpanel of the Senate Appropriations Committee that the Pentagon is closely watching its inventories and working with the defense industry to replenish weapons such as Javelin and Stinger missiles as soon as possible.

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Army’s Gen. Cavoli nominated to lead US and NATO forces in Europe

Gen. Christopher G. Cavoli, who has led U.S. Army Europe and Africa for the past four years, will replace U.S. Air Force Gen. Tod Wolters, if confirmed.

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Here is an interview with a WWII veteran who was in 20 different hospitals.

My interview is with George Woodruff. We had become good friends. He is a WWII and Korean veteran. He is an American hero. Not because of what he did while in the military, but what he has done for his fellow veterans.

He is allowing me to share his name.

George Woodruff is a full time resident at Trinka Davis. Way back in his early military career he fell out of a top three tiered bunk and landed on his head. That would be the beginning of years of hospital times and many trips to the ER.

SOH

George, I want to thank you for taking the time to visit with me today. I am honored to be talking to you. Tell me about your early time in the military. When did you enlist?

George

August 8th, 1944.

SOH

Where did you do your Boot camp?

George

I did my boot camp at camp Downes, Great Lake Lakes Naval Training Center.

SOH

How was boot camp?

George

It was not Picnic! March… march… march, until you thought your legs would fall off. Then we had to wear a gas mask; enter a large chamber where you had to remove your gas mask. Tears ran down my face!

Boot camp was tough, but you learned to follow orders that might keep you alive when the actual shooting started. We became men during boot camp.

SOH

Where did you go after boot camp?

George

I was assigned to Basic Engineering School. I was temporarily transferred to the Replacement Depot. It had triple decker bunks there. I figured this was an accident waiting to happen since I was assigned the top bunk. They had no railings back then. And of course it did happen. I woke up one morning finding myself lying face down on the concrete floor. My nose was broken. I went to the aid station and the medical corpsman straightened up my nose.

I had no idea how serious my injuries from the fall actually were. I was to find this out the hard way over the many years as problems caused by the fall worsened.

I was in Army Hospitals 7 times during my service. Three of these were in Germany during the Berlin Airlift. I was in Navy Hospitals twice, once at Great Lakes for Scarlet Fever and once at Oakland Naval Hospital.
Since getting out of service I have been in VA Hospitals more than 20 times over the years.

SOH

Were there any incidents that stood out during your training?

George

We had a slightly overweight sailor who as not too clean. He bathed rarely. We finally grabbed him and took him to the shower. We used a stiff brush and soap and scrubbed him until his skin was red. From that day on that sailor was the cleanest guy in the barracks.

SOH

Tell me more on how your fall affected you as you went along in the service.

George

It was during the training period that problems from my fall began to manifest themselves. I would have periods of extreme irritability and occasional memory loss.

SOH

Did the fall cause you problems in your daily duties?

George

Yes, one day I was driving a forklift and blacked out. I went over the edge of a wall and crashed down onto a large diesel engine a few feet below. I was sent to Oakland Naval Hospital for evaluation and treatment. While I was in the hospital, Japan agreed to surrender on August 14th, 1945. Atom bombs had been dropped on Hiroshima, and Nagasaki.

SOH

What happened to you after your hospital visit?

George

I was honorably discharged on September 29th, 1945. I was awarded a 100% disability.

SOH

I see you were also in the Army, how did that happen?

George

I met a Sergeant in Houston who happened to be a recruiter. He invited me to his office, and he had a small bar. We had a few beers. I took some tests he asked me to take. We have several more beers. When I woke up the next morning, I was on a train to Ft. Ord, California! I had somehow joined the Army in 1947! (I did my basic at Ft. Ord, Just like George did. We have a lot in common.)

SOH

George went on to be trained at the Vent Hill Farms Station near Warrenton, Virginia. He was training for the Army Security Agency. (I too was trained to be an ASA trooper.) They trained people to do be radio intercept operators, cryptologist, and radio repair technicians.

SOH

I notice you spent much of your time at many different hospitals. That must have been tough.

George

I was in VA hospitals over seven times during my military days and over twenty times so far after I was discharged.

SOH

Let’s talk about now. One of the things you really had a hard time with was being separated from your wife Jeannie. Share your thoughts on that.

(Jeannie began to have memory loss and needed to be sent to a special facility that cares for those problems, and George had to be in a VA facility because of his problems. They had to live in separate places.)

“When Jeanne and I could no longer live together I felt like my world had ended. After so many years of a wonderful marriage we were torn apart by our failing health. It broke my heart and took away my reason for living.”
 
(This is an actual quote from George in an email to me.)
 
SOH
George now lives at the Trinka Davis Assisted Living Facility, in Corrollton, Georgia. This is a VA facility for military only. It was started by the good graces by Trinka Davis, who donated millions to get it started. 
 
SOH
 
George is now on hospice care, and has many ailments including congestive heart failure, diabetes, hearing loss, stenosis of the spine, problems still from his head injury, and many other ailments. He still has a very positive attitude. He has been an inspiration to me, and I will never forget him. He is a true American hero.
 
 
·        
 
In honor of my good friend George Woodruff, I am going share a poem he wrote in February of 2014. He told me he was extremely depressed when he wrote this poem, because he knew he would be separated from his wife Jeannie soon. 
 
Saga of a Disabled World War II Veteran
 
Time has passed me by and now I’m sick and old, nearly blind, kidneys failing, stenosis crippling my spine.
 
A pair of painful legs that no longer function or hold me up, a power wheelchair for this worn out old carcass of mine. 
 
So I guess I’ll bear this continual depression and pain. 
 
Until the Supreme Architect above finally takes me away. So God if you are up there somewhere listening to my prayer,
 
I would really appreciate it if you decide to do it today!
 
George Woodruff

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There will be more interviews in future posts. My next one will be with a Vietnam veteran. He has some very scary situations he had to go through. Keep coming back to see more. Better yet…God tot he top of this page and click on Subscribe. When you do all future posts will come directly to your inbox.

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Checking in on you. How are you doing? Is everything going OK, or are you struggling?

FEAR NOT!

There are over 14,572 veterans on this site who have your back.

Here is what I am asking you to do…please share this site with as many other veterans as you can. It has helped so many.

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If you are battling mentally, but you are losing, GET HELP!!

Here is a toll free number that you can call 24/7. There are highly qualified counselors there to help you, and they will not hang up until they know you are OK.

1-800-273-8255…texting 838255.

_______________________________________________________________

Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never, ever, give up!

_______________________________________________________________

+If you like what you see, please subscribe at the top of this page where it says, “subscribe.” When you do, all future posts will come directly to your inbox. Also, if you know some else who could benefit from this site, please let them know.

Get the VA Compensation You truly Deserve

+If you like what you see, please subscribe at the top of this page where it says, “subscribe.” When you do, all future posts will come directly to your inbox. Also, if you know some else who could benefit from this site, please let them know.

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Military news…

Earlier this month, a Marine Corps recruiter kicked through a car windshield with his bare foot to rescue a man trapped in an overturned vehicle.

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If you see metal fillings and other dental work that uses Civil War technology in someone’s mouth, you know they’ve been treated by a military dentist.

(Ouch!)

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I am going through the process I posted below. It is a long and tedious process. The important things is, if you truly have something you think you should have compensation for… never, ever, give up. That is what they want you to do.

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VA disability compensation benefits are a monthly, tax-free payment to Veterans who were injured, sustained a long-term illness or experienced a worsening medical condition during their military service.

In addition to compensating Veterans whose disabilities incurred while serving in the military, Veterans may also be granted compensation for specific post-service medical conditions that arose because of their military service. Known as presumptive disabilities, these conditions may not have arisen in service but may be granted as service-connected because its occurrence can been linked directly to military service.

VA recently added new medical conditions to a growing list of presumptive disabilities, which you can view here. These conditions can be presumed to have occurred because of an exposure to Agent Orange, ionizing radiation, and service in the Gulf War.

How to file a claim for disability compensation

The COVID-19 pandemic has not halted the claims process. Veterans can still file claims, and VA is still processing them. VA recommends filing a claim online, but it can still be done in person or through the mail. To get started, visit the VA disability compensation webpage and follow the steps listed below.

Step One: Prepare documents before starting your application

Gather any evidence, documentation and/or required forms that support your claim before beginning your application. This might include:

You must include both the required and (if necessary) supplementary documents or your application will be voided. In some cases, you may need to turn in one or more forms to support your claim.

Step Two: File your claim

There are three ways to file a claim: online, in person (with a VA representative, or with a Veterans Service Organization) or through the mail. Online applications are simple and easy to complete. You can access the application by visiting the Application for Disability Compensation and Related Compensation Benefits webpage, then sign into your VA.gov account (or create a new account at the ID.me website). You can save your progress online for up to one year before the application expires.

If you do not have access to a computer or internet device, VA also accepts printed disability claim applications that can be filed either in person or through the mail. In person applications can be submitted to your local VA regional office. Visit VA.gov/find-locations to find a VA regional office in your state. If you wish to mail your application, please do so by sending it to the following address:

Department of Veterans Affairs

Claims Intake Center

PO Box 4444

Janesville, WI 53547-4444

Step Three: VA will review your claim and notify you of its decision

VA may require a few months to make a decision on claim applications. The time it takes to review your application depends on three factors:

Once your disability claim application has been reviewed and all required documentation has been received, VA will decide on your claim and send you a notification letter of its decision. The notification letter will include specific details regarding the decisions made on your claim. You can expect to receive your notification letter 7 to 10 business days after a decision is made. Please contact a VA call center if it does not arrive within this period.

Step Four: After you receive a decision

You may ask for a second review if you are not satisfied with VA’s decision. Veterans who filed a claim on or after February 19, 2019, may choose from three application review options. The first, a Supplemental Claim, allows you to add new and relevant evidence (that VA doesn’t already have). The second, a Higher-Level Review, asks for a senior reviewer to examine your case. This option does not allow you to edit or add to your current application. And lastly, a Board Appeal requests a Veterans Law Judge with the Board of Veterans’ Appeals to review your application.

If you have any questions or concerns before, during or after submitting a request to have your decision reviewed, please visit the VA Decision Reviews and Appeals website.

For more information

Life comes with plenty of challenges, but ensuring the wellbeing of you and your family should not be one of them. Visit VA.gov to learn more about VA benefits and services.

If you wish to learn more about the claims process, visit the VAntage Point blog platform to keep up to date on disability claims and benefit eligibility requirements. You can also watch this video series produced by the Office of Information and Technology (OIT).

To request additional help filing a disability claim, learn more about accredited representatives or contact a VA regional office near you to speak with a counselor by calling 800-827-1000.

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I am not sharing an excerpt today from my upcoming book, Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the trenches of Life. I will on Monday. Keep coming back to see future excerpts. Better yet…go to the top of this page and click on “Subscribe.” When you do a future posts will go directly to your inbox.

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Checking in on you…How are you doing? Do you deserve compensation?

FEAR NOT!

There are over 13,610 fellow veterans here who have your back.

If you are battling mentally, because of your need for compensation, GET HELP!!

Here is a toll free number that you can call 24/7. There are highly qualified counselors there to help you, and they will no hang up until they know you are OK.

1-800-273-8255…texting 838255.

___________________________________________

Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never, ever, give up!

__________________________________________

+If you like what you see, please subscribe at the top of this page where it says, “subscribe.” When you do, all future posts will come directly to your inbox. Also, if you know some else who could benefit from this site, please let them know