Veterans Are 50% More Likely to Commit Suicide

A new record. Two days in a row!

I am afraid today’s topic is very serious. More than 22 veterans take their own lives every day. Yes, I said every day.

The glaring statistic is that those who seek help for the VA are much less likely to commit suicide, because of this I have some statistics and thoughts.

The Va reported that out of 20 veterans that committed suicide 6 had been to the VA for help, but 14 had not. Pretty clear that is vital that you seek help. You will have much more support, and because of that you will a much better chance of survival.

Things we need to ask:

  • Did those 14 veterans private sector care?
  • Were those veterans eligible to use the VA?
  • Were They among those discharged for untreated undiagnosed mental health disorders related to sexual trauma or combat?
  • Did they find the veteran discerned for personality disorder during the era of “Don’t ask, Don’t tell?”

The bottom line is that if you are struggling, get help now!! Below is the helpline to call and get help:

(877-247-4645) Then press 1.

I feel your pain. I have been there. Do not let the dark side overcome you. Seek the light, and tell the darkside he is outta here.

Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never ever give up!

June 6th was the 75th Anniversary of the Invasion of Normandy

It has been a very long time since I last posted. I can make up a bunch of excuses, but the bottom line is that I got burnt out and needed a break.

I am fresh and ready to write every day again.

Today’s post will be mostly about the invasion of Normandy 75 years ago. I have interesting stats pertained to the day:

156,000 troops from the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, France, and many other allies partook during this invasion.

5 beaches along the 50 mile stretch of Normandy coast were targeted for landing, with the allied code names of Utah, Omaha, Gold, and Sword.

6,000 landing ships and crafts. .

50,000 vehicles were used.

11,000 Planes were used.

12,004 total killed , wounded, or missing. (United States 8,230, United Kingdom, 2,700, and Canada 1,074)

326,000 who reached the beaches by June 11th.

496, 777 WWII veterans who are still alive as of 2018.

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This was a horrible day for lost soldiers, but in the end it was much needed and led to the victory for the allies later.

If you were one of the soldiers who fought on that day, God bless you and you are a bonafide hero. You truly are the “Great Generation.”

If for some reason you are struggling with PTSD, TBI, depression, war wounds, etc, Please get help. Here is a phone number you can call to get immediate help:

(877-247-4645)

In closing, I hope you like these type of posts. If you want to receive future posts without having to come back to this site, just go to the top of this page and subscribe. then you will receive every post in you inbox as they come.

Stories From Our veterans Who Have Been there

I am back with some more interviews with veterans for my book, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.”

I would like to share some current military news first. I will call this Facing the Tasks of Life. It will have stories from all over the world where our veterans are, and some stories from those who are now transitioned into civilian life. Hope it is interesting to you.

  1. A Iraq Veteran is now an astronaut for NASA. Lt. Colonel Anne McClain, blasted off from Kazakhstan December 3rd for a six month stay at a space station. She is only 39. She was a helicopter pilot in Iraq.
  2. Thank a Vietnam veteran on March 29th. It is Vietnam Veteran’s Day.
  3. A new law signed by Congress will “create jobs,” for veteran owned businesses. It will allow veteran owners to have access to military equipment that the military has no more use for.
  4. Senators question the VA on unused suicide prevention funds. Congress OKed 6.2 billion dollars to the military and yet only $57,000 of it has been used for suicide prevention. (What’s wrong with this picture!!)

Now I will share one interview I have done recently for the book, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.” This is only excerpts from the interview. You will have to buy the book to get “the rest of the story.”

I was able to talk to a vietnam veteran a while back. It was very hard to get him to answer anything about his actual combat. I did find out he has a purple heart, because of a serious injury. He is battling PTSD, and battled alcohol addiction for several years after he got out. He however said he would like to tell a uplifting story about his time there.

His group of men had settled down in the jungle to make camp. It turned out they stayed there for a long time. One day my soldier was sitting with a buddy and he looked up into the trees. There were monkeys everywhere. He told his buddy that he wanted one of those monkeys as a pet. His buddy said “No sweat!” He got a coconut and cut a hole in it. He cleaned it out and put a quarter in it. He tied a rope to it and put it out in a clearing.

Soon several monkeys came up to it because of curiosity. One reach in to get the quarter he tried to pull he hand out and couldn’t The buddy slowly pulled the monkey over to the soldier and said, “Here ya go!”

My soldier loved that monkey. He took very good care of him. He even built a cage to let him sleep in. Made a bed out of ferns etc. The monkey got very attached to the soldier. They were real buddies.

However, some of the other soldiers didn’t like the monkey because he was coming to their tents and stealing food. One soldier got so angry he made a parachute for the monkey and threw him over a cliff.

This made my soldier very angry. He was depressed and missed his monkey. Then one day coming through the tents came that same monkey with the parachute still attached to him. He didn’t give up , and found his way back to his master.

This is just one interview of many I have done for the book , Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.” The rest of the book are stories from my time in the military, and how I survived. Each chapter will talk about survival, especially for those who struggle with PTSD, TMI, Depression, Anxiety, War wounds, etc.

Check back here often to read more stories from veterans like yourself.

You can get these posts delivered to your email box by subscribing to the blog. Just click on the “Subscribe” icon at the top and go from there.

Are you are a veteran and wonder why things are happening to you that you aren’t pleased with? You certainly are not alone. I was there. Millions of other veterans were there. The important thing is to realize you need help. Too many of our brothers and sisters hide their feelings and become part of the 22 veteran suicides EVERY day. Do not let that happen. Get help!! The 24/7 help line is 1-800-273-8255 Press 1.

You need to also remember.

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…Never, ever, give up!