Do not Forget our Paralyzed Men and Women in the Military

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Just checked the mail, and I got a letter from the Paralyzed Veterans of America.

These wounded men and women deserve our praise.

While serving on active duty in Iraq, Navy Seabee Peter Herrick was paralyzed from the neck down from shrapnel from a mortar attack. After returning home, Peter wondered how he could recover his life.

With hands on help from the Paralyzed Veterans of America, Peter and his wife Diana got the assistance their family needed for Peter’s recovery.

This is just one story of thousands of veterans who are paralyzed.

Although returning home from the battlefield is generally thought to be one of the cheerful experiences possible, it is a nightmare for the paralyzed veteran.

Just imagine what runs through their minds as they recover from their injuries: Will I ever be able to work again? What will my family think? How will I be able to travel? Will I have enough money to pay for all the unknown medical expenses?

Paralyzed veterans will face these and many other hurdles as they search for a job; as they face lifelong discrimination due to their disability; as they attempt to rejoin families and loved one, and as they struggle to simply stay alive.

I am not telling you to support. I am Asking you to share what you can to help your brothers and sisters in need.

You can mail a check to Paralyzed Veterans of America, 801 Eighteenth Street NW, Washington DC 20006.

Their website is: www.PVA.org/Supportveterans

I will be sending a check today.

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Yesterday was my birthday. (I finally turn 21! ) Actually 81, but who’s counting.

Today we had lunch in my backyard with my two sons and their spouses, plus one beautiful little granddaughter. We had the backyard all set up for social distancing, and the sun was shining.

As I sat there feeling blessed, I thought about my one son who served two tours in Iraq as a hospital administrator. He saw things he has a hard time sharing. He shared he has physical problems connected to the military, and is drawing compensation for it. I could see his shoulder was giving him pain. My son retired as a full Colonel, but I remind him that even though I was only a specialist I am still his father. LOL

My son is an example of the thousands of service men and women who served their country and was deployed into harm’s way. We owe them so much.

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How are you doing my friend? Were you wounded? Do you have war wounds that are giving you fits? You are not alone! There are over 8, 900 veterans here who may have been through the same things you have. Lean on them. Just make a comment of the bottom of this page, I will read it and get back to you.

If you life is overwhelming right now. GET HELP!! Do not let the darks side overcome you. There are trained counselors to help at the toll free number I am about to give you:

1-800-273=8255.

Please call it if you need help.

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+If you like what you see, please subscribe at the top of this page where it says, “subscribe.” When you do all future posts will come directly to your inbox. Also, if you know some else who could benefit for the site, please let them know about it. You may be saving a life. Your comments will not be seen by other people, just me, and I will connect with you to see if you are OK to share it.

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Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all….never, ever, give up!

Time to be Strong in a Not so Friendly World

It has been an interesting two months. I have been grounded in my home because of underlining problems with my health. Can’t go to a restaurant. Can’t meet friends and talk. Can”t hug my kids and grandchildren.

There are many other no, noes. However I am sure you know them.

So what can we do?

Some suggestions:

  1. Yes, you can watch TV all day.
  2. Go for walks. My wife and I went walking this afternoon. It was hot, and I struggled, but I am glad I went.
  3. Call ALL your family and friends and see how they are doing. Yes, this may take several days. Here’s what happens: You put a smile on their face, and because of that you have one too.
  4. Read! What a perfect time to sit in your favorite chair and read. I can recommend my first book, Signs of Hope: Ways to Survive in an Unfriendly World. I am sold out, but it is on Amazon as an e-book. I also suggest the Bible. Lots of drama, happy endings, sad endings, and lots of hope.
  5. Get creative around your house. I took on cleaning out two cupboards in the bathroom. They both were a mess. When I was done they were well organized, and I felt proud.

As a veteran what is happening is very hard on me. I am use to structure, but not this bad. I would rather be able to go where I want to when I want to.

How are you doing?

Are you climbing the walls? Is your temper a little loose? Do you want to stay in bed instead of facing the day. You aren’t alone. There are many other veterans in the same boat with you.

Stay Strong!

Be an asset to your family not a hindrance. Show leadership and keep your family happy.

I encourage you to subscribe to this site. There will posts with hope and love for our veterans. Just go to the top, and click on subscribe.

Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never unloved.

You are forsaken.

And above all…Never, ever, give up!

A Sniper Shares His Hurts and Regrets

Today is Red Friday. We should all be wearing red to show support our active duty military.

I’ve had some amazing interviews with veterans while putting my new book, Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.

I interviewed WW ll, Korean, Vietnam Iraq, and Afghanistan soldiers.

Some of the interviews were funny; some were sad; and some were hard to listen to.

Today I will share one interview to show you some of the fear, disappointments and anger our veterans have gone through.

Interview with a Sniper

I talked to a veteran from El Paso, Texas. He was a Sargent First Class. His duties were being a sniper.

He was asked if it was hard to shot another person. His answer was, “Not since I was helping my buddies stay alive.”

Death of His Buddies

The next question I asked him was how many of his buddies were killed. He said,”Fifteen or sixteen.” I said, “That must have been hard on you.” He said, They were my friends, what can I say.”

It is Hard on Families

He was getting irritated, so I switched to his family. I asked him if he was married. He said, “I was, but I am divorced now.” I then asked, “Can you tell me why that happened? ” He said, “The separation was to hard on both of us. She went her own way because she was so lonely.” He also said he had three children that he only sees once and a while.

There is much more to this interview, but you can see that he had a very rough time while in the military.

Many other stories like this

I have many more interviews to share. Be sure to subscribe to make sure you do not miss one. Just go to the top and click on the subscribe icon. Then all further posts will go directly to your inbox.

Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never, ever, give up!