Some Memorial Day Heroic Stories-Marines

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May 27th, 2017

Thanks to all of you who have been joining us here. The response has been wonderful.  We just past 3,885 new subscribers. That was a huge increase in 2016. We only had 1,000 two years ago. In 2017 help us to make it to 4,000.

We are only 115 away of reaching our goal.  We will be giving a prize to the person who is our 4,000th person to subscribe. 

Help us make it to 4,000 by subscribing today if you haven’t already. This shows you care for veterans. Just click on the icon right after the title of this post to do that, and the posts will come straight to your inbox.                            ____________________________________________________________

Doug Bolton, the founder of the blog, Signs of Hope, which is at www.dailysignsofhope.com, has written a new book, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.” It reaches out the many military and veterans who may be battling anxiety, fear, depression, addictions, rejections, and the many other usual suspects. There are 22 military connected suicides every day. That is almost one every hour. Doug wants to help stop those statistics.  

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This is a new social network just for veterans. I joined it and made instant friendships with veterans who want to talk about what I want to talk about. Please check it out. You will be glad you did. 

www.rallypoint.com/join/spc-douglas-bolton

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We have just added a fantastic product for people who are suffering from PTSD.I have looked at the video myself. It is a little long, but it is very valuable. Go to   https://sites.google.com/site/v4vweaponspackage/  to see for yourself. It will change your life if you suffer from PTSD. 

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The war combat heroes are many. My book I am writing called, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and out of the Trenches of Life,” is full of heroes. I have written about many who talked to me on the phone and shared their story. These are stories about heroes.

I have shared my experiences while deployed to Korea. I speak out against soldiers giving in to PTSD. I cry for those who are maimed and in wheelchairs. I share thoughts on how to survive in this not so friendly world.

One of the heroes I talked to I met accidently. I decided to stop at Carl’s (Hardy’s) fast food. I got my meal and was walking towards my seat. I walked by a man that was obviously a Vietnam veteran and a Marine since he wore a hat that said so. I thanked him for his service, and eat my meal.

I watched him. He was in pain. He had a cane. He was bent over. He was younger than I was. He got up to throw his trash away, and I saw legs that couldn’t hold him up too well. He had a heavy limp. As he walked by me, I asked him if he would like to sit and talk with me for a few minutes. He had that look like,”no way man,” but when I told him I was a veteran as well, he sat down.

I started asking him questions knowing I had to walk a thin line so I didn’t intrude into area he didn’t want to talk about.

Here is how the conversation went.

Me: Where and when did you serve?

Marine: I was on a helicopter ship off the coast of Vietnam.

Me: What did the helicopters do?

Marine: They sent supplies to troops; Carried troops from one battle station to another; sent food to the villages for the people who were starving.

Me: What was the worst moment you had while stationed there?

Marine: My very best friend was a helicopter pilot, and one mission his helicopter had a problem;  went off the end of the ship down into the water. He and another Marine were trapped in the helicopter and it went to the bottom of the ocean. The water was to deep to try to recover their bodies.

Me: So Sorry my friend. Were there any other bad moments for you?

Marine: When  we came home on the planes the people lined the terminal and called us names, and had signs that called us murders and other things.

I have more from this hero, but you will have to buy the book to read the rest of his story, (This is called a hook!) and many other interviews  from WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan. These are all heroes you need to learn about.

I want to thank all over our veterans and current military, for their dedication and service to their country. You are all Heroes. God bless each and everyone of you.

For those who have lost a loved one, like family, I feel your pain. I have been there. God is our strength, and our fortress. He will see us through the storms we face.

For those veterans who may be struggling:

There is always help for you 24/7 at: 1-800-273-8255

 

Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never, ever, give up!

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Being Deployed to the Bay of Pigs

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June 23rd, 2015

Thanks to all of you who have been joining us here. The response has been wonderful .  We just past 2,870 new subscribers. That is a huge increase in one year. We only had 1,000 a year ago. Our goal for 2015, is to make it to 4,000.

Help us continue to grow by subscribing today if you haven’t already. Just click on the icon right after the title of this post to do that.

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We are listening! I asked you to subscribe if you like having posts about the military, and the response was very clear. The subscription rate doubled this week from the previous week. That is telling us you want more posts about the military, so they will keep coming, plus updates on the book, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.”

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+ Here is the latest update on the progress of the book, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.”

July 9, 2015

The main body of the book is about finished. I am now working on the appendix, and putting the Table of Contents in order. This means that it is getting very close to being complete.

Last week, I sent out three mini proposals to two publishers and an agent. The proposals will be read and given back to me on August 11th (My birthday BTW..)at a writer’s conference. They may like what they see and meet with me at that time.

Hopefully this book will reach out to the many military people currently serving their country, and the millions of those who are now veterans.

It really doesn’t matter what country you are from. Much of what is being written pertains to any country.

I have added the following sections to the book to cover most everything that a military person may face:

  • PTSD
  • Deployment
  • Domestic violence
  • The spouses left behind
  • Death in the families
  • Basic training problems
  • Foreign assignment stories
  • Loneliness, fear, anxiety, depression, doubt, and the many other usual suspects
  • Personal thoughts
  • More

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I have a son that is retired from the Army. He was a Colonel. He had two tours in Iraq being commander of a field hospital. (Nothing like MASH!)

He doesn’t like to share too much about his time in the service. Some of it is too painful to share. Do you have experiences to share? Were there times when you faced fear? Did you have moments of depression, or anxiety. I sure did when I was in the military.

My time of fear came when I was stationed at Ft. Bragg, North Carolina. It was the end of my duty time for the military. I only had days left before I was to be discharged.

Just when I thought that all I had to do was put in my time, the intercom came to life saying, “All soldiers report to headquarters immediately. This is not a drill.”

I had heard this before, and they have all been drills, but he said this wasn’t a drill. I ran as fast as I could to headquarters, and got into formation. The commanding officer walked up to the mike and said, “The commanding general of the Army has notified me that we are to get ready to be deployed to the Bay of Pigs. This will put you in harms way. Get your gear fast and report back here.”

What? I only have a few days left and I am being deployed into a war zone? I packed quickly and reported back.

They loaded us into buses and took us to the base airport. They then marched us to several planes and started loading us into them. We were in full combat gear.

I sat on the plane with my M-1 rifle between my legs. Those legs were shacking. I looked at the other men, and they too looked very concerned.

Then the plane engines started to roar. The plane started moving to the take-off area.

I began to think about home, and that I may not make it back home if I am going into combat.

The engines got louder like they were ready to take off. Then the plane turned around and headed back to the departure spot. The pilot came on and said, “The mission has been aborted, we are going back to unload you!”

You could see the relief on the men’s faces, and some even began shouting for joy. We came a breath away to being in a war, and on the front lines.

This really happened and is a chapter in the book, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of”Life.”

I will have more stories about the military. So keep coming back to find out what is going on.

To make sure you know when there is a new post about the military, subscribe to this blog by clicking on the icon right after the title. You will then be notified each time there is a new post.

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Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never, ever, give up!

 

 

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The Planet of the Ants!

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July 17th, 2009
The Planet of the Ants

I had an ongoing battle with ants in my driveway. They came up every spring, and I kinda let them work in peace. They are one of God’s creatures, don’t you think? If they stay away from my house, they can march around all they want, and have their little families.

BUT!! This year they became aggressive! They seemed more organized. Big groups of them came out of the cracks at once. Out front were the winged ants. They must have been their air force. Then there were some very militant looking ants. That must have been their marines. Following that was a huge amount of marching ants that came in groups and maneuvered around like they were trying to out flank me. They must have been the army.

The winged ants are much faster than the rest. If they get airborne they can cause much damage. The marine ants come at you like they will fight to the end, and they protect each other with tremendous valor. The army guys are very good at setting up observation posts, and getting behind you with of their infiltration techniques.

I decided I needed to come up with a counter attack. I tried to walk among them to make them to flatten out a bit. This didn’t work, because the “marines,” rushed in and covered my shoes with their little bodies. I ran!

Then I tried the old faithful bug spray. This seemed to work at first as they had many casualties. They dropped back into the cracks, and I did a victory dance.

However, the next day, they must have called up the reserves because there were ten times as many ants as the day before, and they didn’t look like happy campers.

Fear began to fill my soul. I could see the headline in the local paper. “Man eaten alive by angry mob of ants!”

I retreated into my garage for a planning session. I watched as the black mass out on the driveway came my way! There was no time to lose.

Then I remembered the Ace Hardware man, (Ace is the place, you know,) told me about a new ant treat that comes in a can like Pringles chips. It looks pretty harmless. When you put some in your hand, it appears to be ground cereal.

I ran to the garden cupboard, and found the can. I advanced towards the ants. They kept coming towards me. This would be the deciding battle.

I sprinkled some of the “food,” in front of the oncoming hoard of ants. The first row of ants ignored the food at first. The second row stopped. It looked like they smelled the goodies. Then all of a sudden that row of ants started rolling around. They were wincing in pain. The first row stopped and went back to the second row. BIG mistake! They started touching the goodies, and then they too curled up in pain.

Row after row came crawling over the dead ants in front of them, like the civil war, when the soldiers very close to the enemy shot at them as they stood in rows.

This battle went on for about a half hour, and then I started feeling guilty. Those ants had families. They had children. Some were dads. Some were moms, aunts, uncles, cousins. I was wiping out a whole generation.

I stopped laying down the killer food, but it was too late. There was not one ant standing. All were withering in pain and heading to the ant heaven in the sky. I had wiped out a whole nation with one battle.

I don’t see many ants in the driveway anymore. I’m so thankful, because the guilt I still carry wouldn’t allow me to do mass extinction again.

If you have ants outside your house, think about what they are doing. Are they destroying anything? Do they get into the house? Are they too aggressive? If you say no to these questions, you can adopt them. Feed them all you want. As a matter of fact I will tell my ants they can pack-up and come to see you. They will be like the long lost relatives that say they want to visit for a couple of days, and then they stay for months. Enjoy!

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