Some Memorial Day Heroic Stories-Marines

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May 27th, 2017

Thanks to all of you who have been joining us here. The response has been wonderful.  We just past 3,885 new subscribers. That was a huge increase in 2016. We only had 1,000 two years ago. In 2017 help us to make it to 4,000.

We are only 115 away of reaching our goal.  We will be giving a prize to the person who is our 4,000th person to subscribe. 

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Doug Bolton, the founder of the blog, Signs of Hope, which is at www.dailysignsofhope.com, has written a new book, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.” It reaches out the many military and veterans who may be battling anxiety, fear, depression, addictions, rejections, and the many other usual suspects. There are 22 military connected suicides every day. That is almost one every hour. Doug wants to help stop those statistics.  

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This is a new social network just for veterans. I joined it and made instant friendships with veterans who want to talk about what I want to talk about. Please check it out. You will be glad you did. 

www.rallypoint.com/join/spc-douglas-bolton

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We have just added a fantastic product for people who are suffering from PTSD.I have looked at the video myself. It is a little long, but it is very valuable. Go to   https://sites.google.com/site/v4vweaponspackage/  to see for yourself. It will change your life if you suffer from PTSD. 

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The war combat heroes are many. My book I am writing called, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and out of the Trenches of Life,” is full of heroes. I have written about many who talked to me on the phone and shared their story. These are stories about heroes.

I have shared my experiences while deployed to Korea. I speak out against soldiers giving in to PTSD. I cry for those who are maimed and in wheelchairs. I share thoughts on how to survive in this not so friendly world.

One of the heroes I talked to I met accidently. I decided to stop at Carl’s (Hardy’s) fast food. I got my meal and was walking towards my seat. I walked by a man that was obviously a Vietnam veteran and a Marine since he wore a hat that said so. I thanked him for his service, and eat my meal.

I watched him. He was in pain. He had a cane. He was bent over. He was younger than I was. He got up to throw his trash away, and I saw legs that couldn’t hold him up too well. He had a heavy limp. As he walked by me, I asked him if he would like to sit and talk with me for a few minutes. He had that look like,”no way man,” but when I told him I was a veteran as well, he sat down.

I started asking him questions knowing I had to walk a thin line so I didn’t intrude into area he didn’t want to talk about.

Here is how the conversation went.

Me: Where and when did you serve?

Marine: I was on a helicopter ship off the coast of Vietnam.

Me: What did the helicopters do?

Marine: They sent supplies to troops; Carried troops from one battle station to another; sent food to the villages for the people who were starving.

Me: What was the worst moment you had while stationed there?

Marine: My very best friend was a helicopter pilot, and one mission his helicopter had a problem;  went off the end of the ship down into the water. He and another Marine were trapped in the helicopter and it went to the bottom of the ocean. The water was to deep to try to recover their bodies.

Me: So Sorry my friend. Were there any other bad moments for you?

Marine: When  we came home on the planes the people lined the terminal and called us names, and had signs that called us murders and other things.

I have more from this hero, but you will have to buy the book to read the rest of his story, (This is called a hook!) and many other interviews  from WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan. These are all heroes you need to learn about.

I want to thank all over our veterans and current military, for their dedication and service to their country. You are all Heroes. God bless each and everyone of you.

For those who have lost a loved one, like family, I feel your pain. I have been there. God is our strength, and our fortress. He will see us through the storms we face.

For those veterans who may be struggling:

There is always help for you 24/7 at: 1-800-273-8255

 

Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never, ever, give up!

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Doctor Tests Can be Very Frightening

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June 30th, 2016

Thanks to all of you who have been joining us here. The response has been wonderful.  We just past 3,460 new subscribers. That is a huge increase in 2015. We only had 1,000 a year ago. Help us to make it to 4,000.  Could you be the one that puts us over the top? Our goal for the end of this year is 5,000.

Help us continue to grow by subscribing today if you haven’t already. Just click on the icon right after the title of this post to do that.

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Doug Bolton, the founder of the blog, Signs of Hope, which is at www.dailysignsofhope.com, has written a new book, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.” It will be reaching out the many military and veterans who may be battling anxiety, fear, depression, addictions, rejections, and the many other usual suspects. There are 22 military connected suicides every day. That is almost one every hour. Doug wants to help stop those statistics. Doug sent off his mini proposal to an agent who is very interested in his concept. We will update you when we hear more. 

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I have had a few other interviews recently with military veterans. I have been pretty ill, and haven’t the energy to do much. That is why there haven’t been many post here. I am trying to get back into writing more often.

The latest person I have met, I haven’t had a chance to sit and talk with. I just met him yesterday. I was doing some testing at the hospital, and when I was done. A, 79 year old, man who was very enthusiastic about his job helped me out to where my wife had the car.

As we went, I asked him some questions about his work. I also asked him if he had been in the military. He said yes. We both were in about the same time. He was in from 1955-58, and I was in from 1959-62. I have his name and contact information. We will doing some coffee visits, and sharing thoughts on the military in the future. What we shared will be in upcoming posts.

Continue to come back or subscribe now if you haven’t. Just click on the icon right after the title to do that.

+ Side note.

The tests I was taking were to find out if I had throat cancer, and to see why I was having pain in the prostrate area. The results were that I didn’t have throat cancer. The pain I was having in the prostrate area can be treated with a strong fiber formula they prescribed.

I had another test day before yesterday, to see if I had cancer or and infection on my spine. Result won’t be for a few days, so come coming back to find out the results. I will post it here as soon as I find out.

I hope you are enjoying the personal touch of this site. I sometimes over share, (Wife says that) but I am sure there are many other people going through the same pains I have endured and will benefit from being there with me.

Remember:

You are never alone.

You are never forsaken.

You are never unloved.

And above all…never, ever, give up!

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Two WWII Veteran Interviews

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February 19th, 2016

Thanks to all of you who have been joining us here. The response has been wonderful .  We just past 3,300 new subscribers. That is a huge increase in 2015. We only had 1,000 a year ago. Help us to make it to 4,000.  Could you be the one that puts us over the top? Our goal for the end of this year is 6,000.

Help us continue to grow by subscribing today if you haven’t already. Just click on the icon right after the title of this post to do that.

____________________________________________________________

Doug Bolton, the founder of the blog, Signs of Hope, which is at www.dailysignsofhope.com, has written a new book, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.” It will be reaching out the many military and veterans who may be battling anxiety, fear, depression, addictions, rejections, and the many other usual suspects. There are 22 military connected suicides every day. That is almost one every hour. Doug wants to help stop those statistics. Doug sent off his mini proposal to an agent who is very interested in his concept. We will update you when we hear more. 

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Sorry… it has been a while since I last posted. been some illnesses, other commitments, etc.

Things are happening with my new book, “Signs of Hope for the Military: In and Out of the Trenches of Life.”

On my blog http://www.dailysignsofhope.com. People have been coming in by the thousands to read my excerpts of interviews I have done with veterans. I had one high day of 5,879 hits in one day.

That tells me people are interested in anything that supports our military. I am blessed to be a veteran, and through my interviews I can see that we need to reach out to anyone who is a veteran. As I mentioned in the introduction section, there are 22 veteran suicides a day!

That is not acceptable. I will share here some a couple of the interviews I had with you here, and you can go to my blog at: http://www.dailysignsofhope.com to see others.

One interview I had was with a WWII veteran. He wasn’t too excited to talk about his time during the war, but he did share this:

Me- “What unit were you attached to?” Veteran- ” I was part of the tank Corp.” Me- “What was the worst moment you had during that time?”  Veteran- ” We were stopped to look out over a field ahead of us. We had the top open. A Japanese soldier dropped a grenade on us, and it killed my best friend to my side, and all of the rest of us were wounded.”

This veteran received to Purple Heart, and a Medal of Honor. It was difficult for me to go through the interview with this man. The reason was, he was my Uncle. I had known him from me birth, but didn’t know this story until the interview.

Another WWII veteran I spoke to is still alive today. He is ninety-two years old:

Me- “What branch of the Army were you in?” Veteran- “The infantry.” Me- “What was you worst moments during that time?” Veteran- “During a battle, I was wounded. I had to lay on the battle field pretending I was dead while the German soldiers came through to check the bodies.”

This Veteran also nearly broke my heart, because he also is my Uncle, and I didn’t know his story until I interviewed him.

Those are very shortened versions of the two interviews I had with these men. I also had interviews with a WWII nurse, three Vietnam military, and a couple Iraq and Afghanistan veterans. I am searching for more interviews, so if you are a veteran and are open to talking to me about your experience, leave a comment below and I will get back to you. No one has to have their name mentioned in the book.

I want you to know something right now. If you are a veteran or a family member/friend of a veteran, know that someone cares. You are not alone. You are not forsaken. You are not unloved.

One last plea is that you never, ever, give up!

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